.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Editorials

  • Honoring our most recently fallen heroes

    Since the American Civil War brought the full horror of warfare to American shores, the United States has observed a day late in May as a time of remembrance and reflection for our nation’s war dead. Since then, too many more have joined the hundreds of thousands from that 19th century calamity.

  • Base annexation debate on the facts, not rumors

    The Perry County News hasn’t taken a direct stand on Tell City’s annexation effort.  We did publish an editorial finding some fault with the ordinance eventually adopted by the city council in April, but we have not stated our view on whether annexation should happen or not.

    The entire process is currently in a 90-day period during which a remonstrance can be filed. An effort to gather signatures needed for a formal challenge is under way and apparently making good process.

  • Scary green alien trapped by government official

    Yep, you read that right. Aliens are threatening Perry County’s borders. No longer the stuff of science fiction, the metallic green aliens with large eyes, long flat backs and numerous legs have found us.

    But don’t run panicking into the streets just yet, scanning the skies for UFOs. Instead, look closely at your woodpiles, the bundles of firewood for sale, the beautiful ash trees shading your front yards.

  • Welcoming committee would be asset to community

    Last week, the News published an article by guest columnist Shawn Jones about the possible formation of a welcoming committee in Perry County. The community outreach group would serve to identify and support individuals and families new to the area and would be created by Quality of Life, a subgroup of the Perry County Development Corp.

    According to Jones, the group is currently working to create such a committee. We hope they do.

  • More-sensitive signals would negate need for new law

    Some vehicles can now legally run red lights in Indiana, and we’re not talking about just making right turns on red.

    The state legislature approved a bill and Gov. Mike Spence signed it March 27 allowing two-wheeled vehicles, including motorcycles, scooters and bicycles, to proceed through a red light after two minutes if they make sure the intersection is clear first.

  • Farmers markets growing; you’re invited to learn more

    An April 14 meeting at the Tell City Depot will share details of Perry County’s upcoming farmers market. We hope the turnout is large since the popularity of local markets in general and Perry County’s in particular is – pardon the pun – growing.

    If you didn’t make it to last year’s market, held at the Depot each Wednesday and Saturday, you missed out on a great selection of locally grown fruits and vegetables. Crowds were large, vendors made money and the community found a regular supply of nutritious food.

  • Facts point to benefits of reducing, reusing and recycling

    With the county’s recycling bills due last Saturday, many of us turned our thoughts to empty bottles and old newspapers as we wrote our checks to the Perry County Recycling Management District. Some of us paid the bill without hesitation, some of us grumbled as we stamped the envelope and dropped it into the mail. A few of us may not have paid it at all.

    However we feel about recycling and the annual $32 fee, all property owners, residential or commercial, in the county that generate trash are required to foot the bill.

  • Fish & Wildlife should ease Eagles Bluff restrictions

    The Perry County Parks and Recreation Department would like to put camping facilities for recreational vehicles at its Eagles Bluff Park but is barred from doing so under terms its board agreed to when it acquired the land from the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service in 2000.

    Times and conditions change, and we believe the camping facilities should be permitted, as they would be a money-maker for the parks department and keep it from being dependent on only grants and money from tight federal government budgets to fund its projects.

  • County should support quicker ambulance responses

     

    We don’t have statistics to back us up, but feel it’s safe to say people in general are reluctant to voluntarily pay more taxes.

    If we did have stats, we’re sure we could show that most of the approximately 45 people who assembled in the commissioners room at the county courthouse Jan. 23 were a statistical anomaly. As we reported Jan. 30, all or nearly all of them raised their hands when County Councilman Ron Crawford ask-end at a meeting Jan. 23 how many would support a tax increase to fund ambulance service based at the county garage.

  • Tax burden must be fair

    Local government leaders are anxiously watching the Indiana Legislature as it tinkers with yet another form of taxation this session.

    When word first started filtering out that eliminating a major source of income to cities and towns, the business personal property tax, was high on Gov. Mike Pence’s list, local government leaders became nervous. In a story published last Monday, we reported that the loss of revenue for Tell City alone could exceed $450,000.