• Staff deserves credit for making News successful

    We don’t normally toot our own horn on these pages, but since the Perry County News was named the Perry County Business of the Year by the Perry County Chamber of Commerce at the Schweizer Fest last week, we think this is an appropriate time to salute some of the people who helped us earn this award.

    We have a mix of longtime and fairly new employees on our staff, but nearly all of them live in and are active in the Perry County community.

  • An eyesore unworthy of Tell City’s Swiss spirit

    It was a showdown of sorts on Seventh Street a few weeks ago. Carolyn Barr stood in the front yard of the dilapidated Obrecht House, barring city officials from looking inside.

    Her attorney had already said the News couldn’t go inside. Though disappointed, we acknowledged the house is private property. City employees, among them the police chief, had no warrant so they milled around a little and went back to City Hall for their meeting on what to do with Barr and her home.

  • A clean city and a clean conscience

    A dollar is a dollar and most of us avoid wasting even one. But shame on those who swindle the city out of a trash tag just to save a buck.

    As we’ve reported several times over the past year or two, the city faces a growing problem of people who either refuse to tag their trash bags or who cut tags in half, then try to finagle the tags so it appears there is a full tag on the bag.

    The city catches violators and charges them the full buck. We’d suggest a fine.

  • Improving public safety requires cooperation

    It wasn’t much of a shock to hear more than one county council member say during their Thursday regular session that their plans for public safety tax money is prioritized. The acknowledgments came amid a heated discussion that ensued with crews that staff local fire departments, ambulances and first responders after the council decided to earmark nearly $75,000 for a new sheriff’s deputy, patrol, jail officer and the associated benefits for the employees.

  • 911 callers, stick to the facts

    With much banter about protocols for police officers, citizens can do a lot to help reduce stressors. A main point would come from accurate reporting of possible dangerous or criminal activity.

    For example, last Monday, July 18, an autistic client of an assisted living facility in North Miami, Fla. escaped the safety of the facility. An employee, Charles Kinsey, pursued the 23-year-old client in an attempt to return him to the home. 911 was called, and dispatchers were told a man was in the middle of the street with a gun, threatening suicide.

  • Parish closings would hurt people, communities

    News that some of Perry County’s Catholic parishes may eventually close under a consolidation plan under consideration by the Archdiocese of Indianapolis came as a shock to many over the past week.

  • Choosing Pence as running mate would not help Trump’s chances

    Mike Pence may not run for re-election as Indiana’s governor after all. Instead, he could run for vice president as Donald Trump’s running mate.

    Pence is reportedly among the finalists that the presumptive Republican presidential nominee is considering as his running mate and recently met with Trump about that prospect.

  • A real problem with Imaginary numbers

    Imaginary numbers. This mathematical concept is real and is not fun, at least in the experience of many high school students. Ask any recent high school graduate.

    It is likely that somewhere in our country today, in a summer session of Algebra 2, a frustrated student is saying to his teacher, “When will we ever use this after high school?”

  • Don’t disarm the wrong side

    Another mass shooting has rekindled the debate about guns and who should be able to buy and possess them. Omar Mateen pledged support to the Islamic State while killing 49 people in a Florida nightclub June 12. And while he may have been inspired by the terrorist group, and not ordered by them, to carry out the cowardly attack, he was a terrorist in every sense of the word.

    Terrorists should not have guns. But how to keep guns away from those who might do us harm without laws doing harm to those of us who don’t harm anyone?

  • Adopting Sanders’ entire platform would be disaster for Democrats

    Sen. Bernie Sanders called Tuesday for a “fundamental transformation” of the Democratic Party, but most of his suggestions would be a recipe for disaster for the party.

    First he wants to eliminate superdelegates, the party officials and leaders who are free to vote for the presidential candidate of their choice at the convention instead of being pledged to a candidate based on votes won in primaries or caucuses.