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Today's Opinions

  • City needs to address stormwater

    I wanted to "take my head out of the sand" (as Cannelton Mayor Smokey Graves said in a June 12 News story) long enough to explain my position as a former Cannelton city councilman regarding the city's sewer rates.

    Let me preface this by saying that it is my understanding that our community is essentially set up as a user on Tell City's sewer system.

    We pay that community monthly based upon how much sewage we send them for treatment. Our rates as individual household users can then be affected by that monthly cost, somewhat of a trickle-down effect.

  • Make TC 150 a beautiful event

    Now that Tell Citians have cleaned out their garages and attics for the community's spring cleanup, it's time to make our city's neighborhoods and business areas look extra nice the city for the upcoming sesquicentennial and 50th Schweizer Fest.

    Simple steps taken now can make our community extra beautiful for the thousands of people likely to visit Aug. 2-9. Even more importantly, making Tell City extra lovely will help us feel even more proud about the city where we live or work, not just this summer, but year-round.

  • Science, not emotion, should dictate energy decisions

    Americans know their nation needs to wean itself from foreign oil - and eventually from petroleum altogether - but seemingly can't agree on the steps they're willing to take to boost oil and natural gas production here at home.

    Should areas off our coasts now off-limits to drilling be opened to exploration? Should drilling be allowed in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, a battle zone for years between environmentalists and those who believe that area's oil reserves need to be tapped?

  • Is another depression coming?

    An older man who struck up a conversation on the other side of a gas pump a week ago worries another economic depression is on its way. He may be right.

    Higher prices for what we put into our cars, trucks and stomachs have many people wondering if another financial collapse isn't around the corner.

    Add to all of that an unstable stock market, climbing unemployment and worries about wars and political instability, and it's enough to bring the most optimistic among us to long for better days when things were a lot cheaper.

  • Little changes can stretch that coveted tank of gas

    As of Friday morning, a gallon of regular unleaded gasoline cost $4.09 at Circle S in Tell City. On average, Americans are paying more than $4 a gallon, which is $1 more than what we were paying this time last year. It's troublesome to see people lined up just to get gas for $3.96 because that's "cheap."

    We are all hurting from rising gas prices. No one is exempt, including industry and agriculture. And that means everything from food to entertainment costs are rising.

  • The year of the home garden

    It's a big year for gardening as more and more value-conscious Americans fed up with high food prices set out to grow a bigger portion of the food they and their families eat. I'm trying to join the trend.

    As a rural area with a strong tradition of family farming and gardening, Perry Countians have long produced a lot of their own food, whether growing vegetables and fruits or butchering animals raised in local pastures.

  • Poke some holes in the courthouse roof

    We're going to spend $57,715 and hope for the best.

    That was the decision that emerged from a May 29 Perry County Redevelopment Commission meeting.

    We understand and appreciate the frustration its members expressed about needing to reroof a courthouse not yet 15 years old. We wish, however, that they'd gone a step beyond merely replacing the shingles.

    As we reported Thursday, a couple of members said they didn't want to authorize that work, knowing problems that led to leaks will remain, but felt it was their best option.

  • Cowbells and William Tell

    I arrived in Tell City's sister city with bells on. Actually the cows were wearing the bells. I was carrying a camera and ambitions of tracking down William Tell in this town in central Switzerland surrounded by mountains.

    Altdorf, which is German for "old village" is about Tell City's size, with a population in 2002 of 8,700. It's the capital of the Swiss canton of Uri. Switzerland is made up of 26 cantons or states making its official name Confoederatio Helvetica make sense. Swiss money and license plates carry the name or the abbreviation CH.