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Editorials

  • Indiana history should be offered in high schools

    One bill introduced in the current session of the Indiana General Assembly would require all Indiana public and charter high schools to offer a semester-long elective course on Indiana history.

    The bill passed the Senate 47-3 and is now before the House.

    We think the House should also pass the bill and the governor should sign it. We would be inclined to make it a required course, but having it available to every student as an elective would be a good start.

  • Flamboyant Trump can overcome turbulence

    The shift of power from one president to the next has rarely, if ever, been as contemptuous as it is now. It is, however, too early to blanketly cast off the Trump era; as like all presidents who have come before, what happens while in office will bear the hindsight of his accomplishments. It may be difficult, but a little optimism would go a long way.

  • Who cares if Kushner serves as Trump adviser?

    President-elect Donald Trump’s many critics can certainly find several things to complain about regarding people he has chosen to fill roles in his administration.

    But we think they would be best served by remembering the old rule about picking one’s battles and not worry about fighting the appointment of Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, as a special adviser based on the federal anti-nepotism law.

  • Holcomb’s initial ideas would move the state in right direction

    This editorial first appeared in the (Bloomington) Herald-Times.

     

    Eric Holcomb became Indiana’s 51st governor in an inauguration ceremony Monday. The Republican is long on political experience as a former state party chairman but short on experience with governing as an elected official. Hoosiers will be well served if his skills with people and diplomacy overrule the instincts built over time to put his political party first.

  • Rebecca Fenn made Perry County a better place

    The end of one year and the beginning of another is a time of transition for many of us. It certainly has been for Rebecca Fenn, who left her role as director of United Way of Perry County at the end of the year. Her efforts in that role over the past 17 years deserve to be recognized.

  • Trump and his cabinet

    As Donald Trump prepares to take his oath as the nation’s 45th president, we, like a good number of Americans, have high hopes he will lead well.

    Trump takes the reins of a federal government without having held elected office or served in the military. He is certainly an accomplished business leader but he’s a new kind of president. Only time will determine if that’s an asset or liability.

  • United Way of Perry County opens grant cycle

    PERRY COUNTY – Health and human service organizations are invited to apply for funding from the United Way of Perry County through March 3.  Grant applications are available on United Way of Perry County’s website at www.unitedwayperryco.org/grantmaking as well as its Facebook page.

    This year, the United Way of Perry County will distribute just under $60,000 in funds to service organizations to fund projects focused on education, health, financial stability and emergency assistance. 

  • It’s time to mend fences

    Seldom has a house fire created so much heat, even after the flames have been extinguished.

    Of course, we’re speaking of the Cannelton fire Dec. 27 in which Fire Chief Chris Herzog was arrested for battery on a police officer. It remains to be seen whether Herzog will be formally charged but the damage to Cannelton’s fire and police departments is already done. That’s unfortunate because the city has enough troubles without infighting.

  • It’s time to end gerrymandering

    When the new year begins, Republicans in Indiana will once again control the governor’s office and have supermajorities in both the House and Senate.

    That means Democrats will again be all but powerless. Republicans will have a quorum all by themselves, so the Democrats can’t even slow down business a little by failing to attend.

    If you’re a strongly partisan Republican, you probably think this is a pretty good deal. But there are good reasons that most Hoosiers should be at least a little worried about the situation.

  • Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus

    Editor’s note: In the months before the Christmas of 1897, an 8-year-old girl named Virginia O’Hanlon wrote a letter to the New York Sun, asking if there really was a Santa Claus. Edward P. Mitchell gave the assignment to Francis P. Church, whose reply to Virginia appeared in the Sept. 21, 1897, edition of the Sun.

    Virginia’s letter and Church’s reply, as it appeared in the Sun, are reprinted below. Virginia O’Hanlon Douglas died May 13, 1971.

     

    Is there a Santa Claus?