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Editorials

  • Tariff would be a threat to local newspapers

    There are two things you need to know about newspapers.

    Newspapers are important to community life and democracy. Always have been. We at the National Newspaper Association think it is important for all sorts of newspapers to survive for the sake of a free society – the very large and the very small ones, the liberal ones, the conservative ones, the middle-of-the-road ones, the ones with no viewpoint but just important news, all of them. Some are our members. Many are not. We defend them anyway. America needs them like we need oxygen.

  • Parks survey a stepping stone to improvement grants

    It has been a long, drawn-out process that has probably taken longer than it should have, but local city and county parks boards now have the data they need to prioritize their goals and compile their master plans for the next five years.

    The Perry County Parks Board began surveying area residents about what they want most from their parks in 2015 and continued to offer surveys online recently. This year it and the Tell City Parks Board combined to get Purdue University staffers to compile and analyze the results of surveys about all the parks in the county.

  • The catch-22 of gauging mental health

    As national mental health month comes to a close in May, we should take a moment to address the segmented status of mental health in the culture. It’s no secret that there are flaws when it comes to addressing mental health. But making it part of routine health checks could reduce persistent stigmas.

  • Policy decisions felt locally

    Politics, or at least the national consciousness of it, rarely seems to focus on policy. Pundits on national media tend to focus more on which players at the national level are “winning” as opposed to what the impact of action, or inaction, in Washington D.C. can be. This was recently seen in the brief coverage of the passage of the federal spending bill in March, which relaxed restraints on military and domestic spending put in place to control the growth of the budget deficit in the aftermath of the Great Recession.

  • Job skills, not just college, key to brighter future

    When it comes to a career, college graduation is not the only measure of success. Our local high schools work hard to prepare students for the next steps in life, through advanced placement coursework, dual credit offerings and vocational classes, and many students will enroll in college.

  • Your vote matters

    Tomorrow is Indiana’s primary election. But most of us know that already, with yard signs, billboards and candidates knocking on our doors. There are locally contested races for sheriff and coroner. There’s also a contested race for Congress and U.S. Senate. The number of races to be decided tomorrow may not be large, but they are important. So, it’s important for you to take part by voting.

  • Jobs require education improvements in state

    Indiana spends about $7 billion a year on K-12 schools and claims to be a pioneer in education reform. Yet thousands of its high school students are graduating without the basic math, reading and writing skills needed to succeed in college.

    That’s what a series of reports from the Indiana Commission for Higher Education have shown since the state started tracking data on the college readiness of its students 11 years ago.

  • Step up for children in need

    It’s often said that no one really knows what takes place behind closed doors. Smiles and laughter often shield the world from real pain hiding beneath. And when it comes to children, their strife is often the result of being caught in the cross-hairs of an adult issue.

    With April being Child Abuse Prevention Month, we encourage all who can to get involved in helping safeguard our children. There are numerous ways in this community to do so.

  • Make your voices heard on local environmental issues

    With all the recent discussion and debate on the pros and cons of a proposed $2.5 billion coal-to-diesel plant that may be coming to the Dale area, it’s heartening to know citizens have a big heart for their community.

    A desire to protect our county’s water, air and soil shows a strong sense of community, as does a desire to provide investment and jobs.

  • Hospital is on right financial track

    It’s good to see Perry County Memorial Hospital doing better financially. As we report in today’s issue, the hospital earned more than $455,686 in the first two months of the year. That follows a financially challenging 2017 in which the hospital basically broke even.

    We reported on the relatively small number of jobs that were cut last year and other positions that were eliminated in an effort to reduce costs as revenue fell below the hospital’s budget.