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Columns

  • Foundation profiles examples of endowed community gifts

    This is one of an occasional series of stories on funds established through the Perry County Community Foundation.

     

    After 27 years in elementary education, most teachers would be thumbing the pages of travel brochures planning an enjoyable retirement. Donna Fenn held a different view of life after work and it involved her lifelong passion of developing literacy skills for young children.

  • Election Day sentiments

    Vince Luecke

    Editor

    editor@perry countynews.com

     

    I’m a creature of habit and tradition. I appreciate that certain things happen each year and working here for 20-plus years has given me a list of annual event that mark the passage of time. Election Day is one of those days.

  • For best yard results, rake: Fall leaves ideal for mulch and compost

    Jeneen Wiche

    Weekend Gardener

     

    Leaf raking is an autumn chore that only children enjoy because they get to undo it in one fowl swoop! We rake and pile; and they jump. I propose a new approach that just may make us all happy: adults can still rake a little, children can still play and trees will benefit from some mulch and fertilizer. At the farm, raking leaves is passé; we let them stay where they fall (with reason, of course) which is usually beneath their canopy.

  • It’s time to give thanks now

    Vince Luecke

    Editor

    editor@perry countynews.com

     

    Jack-o’-lanterns on porch steps, cardboard tombstones sprouting from lawns like toadstools and far too many homes wrapped in fake cobwebs can point to only one thing: Halloween is nearly here.

    I’ll welcome nieces, nephews and maybe a few neighborhood kids to my door for treats Wednesday night, but I’ve come to the conclusion that it’s Thanksgiving – not Halloween – that most deserves a slot on late October’s calendar.

  • Plant garlic, dig sweet potatoes

    Jeneen Wiche

    Weekend Gardener

     

    There are two categories of garlic to consider: Allium sativum, or softneck garlic, and Allium ophioscordon, or hardneck garlic. Softneck garlic is the easiest and most widely cultivated because the bulbs are large and the cloves and skin are tight which prevent moisture loss and allows for longer storage.

  • How will high court shift?

    Mark Franke

    Guest Columnist

     

    Now that we are finally past the hyperbole, embarrassment and downright nastiness of the Kavanaugh confirmation in what used to be the venerable U.S. Senate, perhaps we can step back and take a dispassionate review of why this was so important.

    First, let’s look at the results of several opinion polls that came out during the debate. Most showed Brett Kavanaugh had the lowest positive numbers in history, well below 50 percent favorable but still slightly better than the negative number.

  • Ode to Jack and the turnip

    Jeneen Wiche

    Weekend Gardener

     

    It looks like this late turnip crop is going to be a good one thanks to cool temperatures and adequate rain fall. I may even have some little ones ready in honor of Halloween this year, too, even though they will only be salad size. What does the turnip have to do with Halloween you may ask?

    Well, they just may be more authentic than that pumpkin on the porch.

  • Squirrels and autumn

    Vince Luecke

    Editor

    editor@perry countynews.com

     

    This column first appeared in 2011.

     

    The squirrel was hurtling full-throttle across the road and barely missed being squashed by my car tire Sept. 23. I made a quick trek to the farm to grab my mail and a bite to eat and spotted the squirrel while returning to New Boston.

  • Critiques of capitalism

    Michael Hicks

    Guest Columnist

     

    Anti-capitalist feelings in the United States are enjoying a brief moment in the sun these days. Surveys of young people report that support for socialism is on the rise, and we can even hear some apparently wistful musings about communism from the shallow end of the public debate pool.

    Given that the only coherent national spokesman for socialism is a millionaire with three homes, it’s pretty clear this is not yet serious stuff.

  • U.S. Senate race appears close

    Kelly Hawes

    CNHI News Indiana Columnist

     

    Philip Wegmann describes Indiana’s U.S. Senate race as a battle of centrists. “The Democrat supports a border wall, and the Republican supports protections for pre-existing conditions,” he wrote last month in the Washington Examiner.

    Democratic incumbent Joe Donnelly says he’d fund the wall in exchange for a pathway to citizenship for 1.8 million immigrants who arrived in this country as children.