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Columns

  • COLUMN: ‘Due Date’ lacks heart, but is still enjoyable

    ERIC HARRIS, Film Review

    Comedy is my least favorite genre to review. I love a good comedy as much as anyone, don’t get me wrong, but to critique it is an exercise in futility. Comedy is subjective; it’s all about a viewer’s personal sense of humor.  I suppose one could make this argument for all genres of film, but I find comedies are much more susceptible to divisiveness.  The point is, I can’t tell you whether or not “Due Date” is funny; I can only tell you if I thought it was funny.  

  • COLUMN: Stepping stones to re-entry

    EDWIN BUSS, Guest Columnist

    Albert Einstein once said, “Insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results.” Like so many things in a challenging economy, corrections as we know it must change if we want to expect different results.

  • Our role in America’s future

    ANDI BAUR, Guest Columnist

    Editor’s note: Cannelton High School student Andi Baur composed the following essay and read it as part of Cannelton’s Veterans Day Program Thursday.  

    My name is Andi and I am a proud stitch in the fabric of America. I live in a small town, lived here all my life. I’ve seen a lot of things here. I’ve seen corn growing in fields and a whole lot of people I’ll never really know.

  • Final election thoughts

    By VINCE LUECKE, Editor

    Whew! Another election is in the history books. While political contests normally stir excitement in this editor’s heart, this year’s races included all of that and more, including several doses of catching hell. Some thought we favored Democrats. Others called me a Republican and others called me things I wouldn’t want my mother to read on this page.

    Politics and elections affect people differently. Some live and breathe politics with all their might. Others tune out and a few even run for cover.

  • This Tree: Remembering Redbuds

    By Mary Posner, Aspen Road

    When my husband, Lou, and I moved from Indiana to Connecticut in 1978, we were surprised to discover that there were no redbud trees.  Although Connecticut had its own beauty, we always missed the brilliant color of the redbuds in the spring.

    During our very first trip to Perry County in April of 1988, our hearts lifted when we saw so many redbud and dogwood trees blooming along Highway 37. Many factors went into our decision to move here, but that welcoming sight had its influence.

  • What insurance exchanges offer

    By PETER PITTS, Guest Columnist

    In October, the Department of Health and Human Services closed its comment period for the new regional health insurance exchanges - a major component of the Obama health reforms.

    As state officials implement their plans, they should strive to ensure that these exchanges don't crowd out free-market insurance mechanisms. While the options available on these exchanges will work well for many people, a substantial slice of the patient population will find them unsuitable.

  • Chinese inflation and us

    LARRY DeBOER, Guest Columnist

    Economics is called the “dismal science.” I’m not sure it’s really a science, but lately it sure has been dismal. Most of the economic news over the past three years has been bad. Even a dismal economist gets worn out, so sometimes I go looking for good news. This week I found some, in a headline that said “In China, Inflation Raises Concern.”

  • Paranormal a surprising, chilling sequel

    ERIC HARRIS, Film Review

  • Why my home is in Tell City

    ERIC KEHL, Guest Columnist

    The old saying, “The grass is always greener on the other side” has never held much credence with me. Society has trained us that we are never to be content with what we have. We must always be pursuing that next “thing” that will make us happy.

    Many people think that living in a big city market where many more opportunities are offered to us will make us happier. When in reality, these same markets can make us even unhappier.

  • Remembering the dead

    VINCE LUECKE, Editor

    I once head an interesting story about how one local church pastor, on the occasion of All Souls Day Nov. 2, invited parishioners to gather in the church cemetery for a blessing of graves.

    Each person was asked to stand by a grave and a few minutes later, with people standing by the graves of relatives, friends and perhaps complete strangers, parishioners remembered the dead.