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Columns

  • Factors for vibrant spring blooms

    by Jeneen Wiche

    Weekend Gardener

     

    I have no complaints about plant performance this spring. It was England-like with agreeable temperatures and ample rainfall. Recent steamy days have managed to snap me back to summer-in-the-Ohio valley-reality!

  • What bird is that?

    Vince Luecke

    Editor

    editor@perry countynews.com

     

    I don’t like to think of myself as superstitious. I scoff at Friday the 13ths. I don’t worry about black cats – there’s one in New Boston that darts out in front of me at least once a week – and I don’t worry about walking under ladders, breaking mirrors or stepping on a crack that might break my saintly mother’s back.

  • Favorite springtime perennials

    Jeneen Wiche

    Weekend Gardener

     

    I am getting ready to do some perennial garden renovation, so I am identifying all the plants I want to dig and relocate for the project. This time of the year, two perennials really stand out for their beauty and for their no-fuss existence; Amsonia hubrichtii, or Arkansas blue star, and Baptisia australis, or false indigo.

  • Good luck, graduates

    For the first time in two decades, I won’t be covering a local commencement this month. I’m retiring from the paper next Friday, May17, and as I’ve been thinking of the many, many things I’ll miss, graduations are certainly among them. 

    The familiar strains of “Pomp and Circumstance” inspired me each year with optimism. And, as in years past, I have high hopes for this year’s group of newly minted graduates.

  • Newspaper thoughts

    Vince Luecke

    Editor

    editor@perry countynews.com

     

    I chuckle quietly to myself when I watch old movies, some actually not that old, in which newspaper owners are portrayed as titans of industry, barons of their home cities, oozing in cash and influence. Anyone even halfway familiar with the plight of newspapers today knows that the industry is contracting and shedding jobs and power as Americans find new ways to obtain news that don’t involve ink and paper.

  • Some plants just like it wet

    Jeneen Wiche

    Weekend Gardener

     

    There are some plants that demand good drainage: taxus, coreopsis, gaillardia and penstemon, to name a few. I have lost them all because they were poorly sited in the garden. But now that I know where water is slow to drain, I know where to plant those trees, shrubs and perennials that like wet environments.

  • We can send a man to the moon, we should be able to fix a pothole

    Leo Morris

    Guest Columnist

     

    You’ve all heard the complaint. “If America can put a man on the moon, why can’t it ... cure the common cold, or develop a long-lasting battery, or stop spending more than it takes in, or (fill in your favorite frustration)?”

    My current, less sweeping, version of that lament is: “If Hoosier politicians think they’re smart enough to legislate hate out of the human heart, why can’t they handle something as simple as keeping the stupid potholes filled?”

  • We need to send 10,000 more Hoosier kids to college next year

    Michael Hicks

    Guest Columnist

     

    Over spring break, I read Bryan Caplan’s very popular book, “The Case Against Higher Education.” Many readers of this column might suppose I’d like this book. I tend to support smaller government, and am a frequent critic of higher education. Recall that I’m the professor who thinks tenure is mostly counterproductive to good research and teaching.

  • Timing is key when pruning spring flowering shrubs

    Jeneen Wiche

    Weekend Gardener

     

    June 1st is the official cut off that marks the difference between a spring bloomer and a summer bloomer. Does it matter that you know? Yes, if you want to properly prune, because pruning after June 1st could result in no blooms next year.

  • On farms and forestlands, every day is Earth Day

    Editor’s Note: This guest column was written by Steven Brown, state executive director of the Indiana Farm Service Agency and Jerry Raynor, state conservationist with the Indiana Natural Resources Conservation Service.