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Today's News

  • Wiseman – Eddleman

    The parents of Chelsea Nicole Eddleman of Tell City and Blaine Isaac Wiseman of Branchville wish to announce the couple’s engagement and forthcoming wedding.

    Formal invitations are being issued to family and friends for the ceremony to be held on June 16, 2018, at the Leopold Square at 3 p.m. Reception will follow at the Bristow Community Center at 5 p.m.

  • County seeks a shot in the arm in fight against opioid addiction

    By STUART CASSIDY

    Staff Writer

     

    TELL CITY – Perry County could soon join a number of other communities initiating a nationwide class action lawsuit against pharmaceutical companies that manufacture opioid-based prescription medications. Commissioners discussed the topic at it’s regular session of the board Monday.

  • Special Olympics 2018

    Special Olympics 2018 was underway early Saturday at Legion Field despite a light drizzle threatening to rain out events. A flag presentation, torch bearers, a prayer and the pledge of allegiance started the ceremonies, then everyone broke off into their respective events.

    Organizers, coaches, judges and volunteers directed participants to their stations and the games began. Events included Nerf styled javelin tossing, shot put, softball toss, bocce roll and various distances of walks and runs.

  • Gene and Janet Hurm

    Gene and Janet Hurm will celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary on May 18, 2018. A vacation is planned for a later date.

    Gene Hurm and Janet Dupps were married on May 18, 1968, by Father Ted Tempel at St. Joseph’s Catholic Church in Jasper.

    They are the parents of two sons, Scott (Shirley) Hurm of Jasper and Shaun (Teresa) Hurm of Carmel. They have five grandchildren.

    Mr. Hurm retired as safety director at Mulzer Crushed Stone. Mrs. Hurm retired from German American Bank.

  • School community mourns loss of educator

    By ERIC WHITTAKER

    Feature Writer

     

    PERRY COUNTY – Heavy hearts filled the high school library Monday as members of the Perry Central School Board, principals, directors and teachers opened the meeting with a moment of silence, acknowledging the loss of Seth Clark, Perry Central technologies director, who died over the weekend.

    A 1997 graduate from Perry Central, Clark returned to teach at his alma mater and had been a fixture at the school for more than a decade. An obituary appears on Page 2A.

  • Tell City ends annexation fight

    By VINCE LUECKE

    Editor

     

     

    TELL CITY – After four years of legal wrangling, shifting laws and spiraling expenses that have topped $312,000, the Tell City Common Council voted Monday to end its efforts to annex more than 1,700 acres of land into the city.

    The move, made with little fanfare and before a mostly empty city council chambers, put a quiet end to a long legal drama that began in 2014.

  • Voters give Malone, Etienne big wins

    By VINCE LUECKE

    Editor

     

    PERRY COUNTY – Alan Malone easily won the Democratic nomination for the office of sheriff in Tuesday’s primary election, holding off a challenge by Marty Haughee in the only locally contested race on their party’s ticket. Malone, who is seeking his first full term as sheriff after being appointed to the position in the fall of 2015, received 64 percent of votes cast in the race. The final margin was 1,738 votes for Malone to Haughee’s 976 votes.

  • Christianity and moose meat

    CHARLES ARESON

    Guest Columnist

     

    A friend of mine, Jim Adkins, asked me to help his father-in-law take a copy of his book, “Wild Taste of Nature,” and format it so it could be published through CreateSpace. The book had been printed years before with Xerox copied pages and a cardstock cover. This is how I meet its author, Irv Rueger.

  • Late Night with the Marksmen
  • Songs from the heart: Hilgenhold’s

    When Luke Hilgenhold first picked up a guitar five years ago, he never thought the melodic hobby would drive his career focus. Now seeking a country sound all his own, he strives to fit squarely somewhere between Haggard and Hunter Hayes, a mix of classic and modern, and with a message that comes from deep within.

    “Country music has changed to a more pop country … and I still love that stuff,” Luke said, “but I really love that good ole classic country with that steel guitar.”