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Today's News

  • New mayor eliminates fire-department positions

    Graves says he'll exercise authority as he sees fit

    CANNELTON - The first Cannelton Common Council meeting of the year, conducted by a new mayor and mostly-new city council, was to be brief, Mayor Morris "Smokey" Graves indicated as he was starting it. An effort on his part to eliminate two fire-department positions, however, generated enough conversation to stretch it to an hour of verbal jousting, despite his efforts to shut it down.

  • When winter's worst approaches, safety begins with staying informed

    The National Weather Service issues storm warnings and watches. Although the terminology hasn't changed for years, some people confuse the difference between a watch and a warning.

    Winter Storm Watch: Winter storm conditions (heavy snow, sleet and freezing rain) are possible within the next 12-36 hours. Continue monitoring weather forecasts. The definition of heavy snow in our area, according to the National Weather Service, is 4 inches or more in 12 hours, or 6 inches or more in 24 hours.

  • At home or on the road, be prepared when storms strike

    Some of the dangers associated with winter storms include the loss of heat, power and telephone service, as well as a shortage of food and supplies. Every home should have a winter storm survival kit. According to the National Weather Service, here are some of the items to include:

    Flashlights and extra batteries.

    Battery-powered weather radio and a commercial radio.

    Non-perishable food that requires no cooking and bottled water.

    First-aid supplies and extra medicine.

    Fire extinguisher, smoke detector and carbon-monoxide detector.

  • Boosters sell cash chances, need auction items

    TELL CITY - Tell City High School Band Boosters are selling chances to win $750, $500 or $250 in their annual cash raffle.

    The drawing will take place at the TCHS boy's last home game against Heritage Hills Feb. 19. Tickets are $2 each or three for $5. Purchasers 18 years and older can get tickets from any TCHS band family. Contact Shari Everly at 547-6320 for more information.

    Also, the boosters are accepting donations from the public and businesses for their annual community auction, scheduled for March 8 at the high-school cafeteria.

  • Lighting the way

    Brent Bloyd, an employee of the Tell City Electric Department, installs a light fixture atop one of the new street lamps being installed this week on Main Street. Bloyd and other electric-utility employees were erecting new street lamps in the 600 block of Main Street Wednesday morning. The new poles are part of a grant-funded project to improve the appearance of four blocks of the city's downtown. The new lights will be located on both sides of Main Street from Jefferson to Pestalozzi streets.

  • Winter storms can be deceptive killers

    Home is the safest place to be, but do you know what to do if stranded outdoors?

    The mercury flirted with 70 degrees this week, making for an abnormally warm early-January week. Winter has been mild thus far, but conditions can change quickly and plenty of winter lies ahead. While no one can accurately predict what mid- and late-winter will deliver, it's wise to be prepared. Other areas of the state have felt winter's wrath and southern Indiana could be next.

  • New Cannelton mayor makes appointments

    Adam Goffinet elected council president

    CANNELTON - The first Cannelton Common Council meeting for a new mayor and mostly-new council Monday brought some routine actions in addition to animated discussion about fire-department positions (see story, this edition).

    Assuming seats as a result of November elections, Lynn Fulkerson, Adam Goffinet, Kim Nugent and John Young III joined incumbent Louis "Snooks" Scarboro at the council table with incoming Mayor Morris "Smokey" Graves and new Clerk-Treasurer Arvina Bozarth.

  • In my day, life was much simpler

    In my day, my mother smoked, drank a little and worked up to the day I was born.

    Our house had an outhouse, an outside pump, a coal stove, four rooms and was climate controlled. (It was hot in the summer and cold in the winter.)

    I slept in a crib until I was literally too big for it. It was brightly painted with lead-based paints.

    There were no childproof lids on medicine bottles, doors or cabinets.

    I rode in cars without the aid of car seats, booster seats, seat belts or air bags, and when we went to town the whole family rode in the back of the pickup truck.

  • Winter offers joys, challenges

    Winter has left me sleepy. Maybe the shortage of sunlight is to blame for my missing energy. Or perhaps it's simply the cold that makes me want to stay under the covers some mornings.

    Even the alluring aroma of coffee from the machine I program before bed fails to rouse my sleepy spirits. I'm not like this the rest of the year. I could fault old age. But I blame winter.

    I have been daydreaming of spring, flowers, T-shirts and green grass. But I know winter has to run its course first. Until then, I'll cope with the long nights and cold.

  • Non-partisanship needed at every level of government

    We applaud new Tell City Mayor Barbara Ewing's decision to retain all the city's current department heads, just as we did former Mayor Gayle Strassell's decision to do so four years ago when she was inaugurated.

    Many of the department heads have served under Democrat Bill Goffinet, Republican Strassell and now Democrat Ewing. One, city recreation director Maurice Harpenau, also served under Democrat Walter Hagedorn.