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Today's News

  • A farewell to a PCMH resource

    TELL CITY – Sheila Gaynor, above left, was the guest of honor during a retirement reception held Wednesday at the Moose. Gaynor recently called it a career after 44 years with Perry County Memorial Hospital. Starting as a business clerk in 1972, a position she recalled paying her a beginning wage of $1.85, she left the hospital for a brief period in 1978 before returning the following year as a payroll clerk. Gaynor rose to become a payroll supervisor in 1993, and in 1996 was appointed the director of human resources, a position she’s held ever since.

  • Dave and Virlee Huffman

    Dave and Virlee (Reggie) Huffman of New Boston are celebrating their golden wedding anniversary. Mr. Huffman and the former Virlee Riehle were married on May 18, 1968, at St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Huntingburg.

    The couple have four children, Angie Huffman of Jasper, Ashley (Kenneth) Moffitt of St. Meinrad, Keith (Libbi) Huffman of Evanston and Kevin (Crissy) Huffman of Dale. Dave and Virlee have 11 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

    Both are retired from the North Spencer School Corp.

  • Abel Leo Paul Turner

    Courtney Lawson and Jason Turner are proud to announce the birth of their son, Abel Leo Paul, born on March 23, 2018, at Perry County Memorial Hospital in Tell City. He was seven pounds and five ounces, measuring 19 inches.

    Able is welcome home by siblings Alexis Turner, age 10; Brayden Lawson, 9, and Brynleigh Lawson, 5.

    Grandparents are Candy Cameron, Jeff Lawson, Carol  Turner and the late Paul Turner, all of Tell City.

  • Perry County Beekeepers to meet May 17

    LEOPOLD – Want to know which flowers the honeybees are using? Have questions about managing swarms?

    Join the Perry County Beekeepers  organization at their next meeting at 6 p.m. on Thursday, May 17,  at the FFA Building at Perry Central. Bill Gibson and Steve Hahus will discuss which plants are good sources of pollen and nectar for bees during the spring honey flow, and Bill will discuss catching swarms and general swarm management.

  • Farmers market returns June 2

    TELL CITY – Tell City’s twice-weekly farmers market will return to the Tell City Depot beginning June 2.

    Hours will be 4 to 6 p.m. Tuesdays and 8 to 10 a.m. Saturdays. Vendors are welcome to sell locally grown fruits and vegetables. This year’s market will be adding a local beef and pork producer. For more information, call (812) 547-7933.

  • Referendum to be on Cannelton ballot in fall

    By ERIC WHITTAKER

    Staff Writer

     

    CANNELTON – Residents in the city of Cannelton will decide a referendum on the upcoming fall ballot. Alva Sibbitt, Cannelton City Schools superintendent, reported that on April 29, Perry County Clerk Amanda Morgan certified the signatures of 87 petitions delivered to her office on March 29.

  • Tell City trash fee to climb by 75 cents

    By VINCE LUECKE

    Editor

     

    TELL CITY – Residents of Tell City will begin paying 75 cents more each month for trash services this summer after a vote Monday by the Tell City Common Council. Households and businesses currently pay a flat rate of $5.50 each month for trash and recycling and purchase $1 tags that have to be affixed to bags set out for curbside pickup. The new monthly rate will be $6.25

  • A Sweet Donation
  • Auctioneer selected for former refinery property

    By DON STEEN

    Staff Writer

     

    TROY – The Spencer County Commissioners took another step toward returning the former refinery property near Troy to productive use. Sale of the property, which has been in county hands pending cleanup and other preparations, could open the area to commercial development.

  • TC schools to offer biomed course

    By STUART CASSIDY

    Staff Writer

     

    TELL CITY – Broadening the reach of science, technology, engineering and mathematics initiatives, Tell City Junior-Senior High will offer a course in biomedical studies when classes resume this fall. With an already successful health occupations curriculum, the biomed offering is expected to help expand the participating students’ understanding of illnesses and preventive measures.