http://www.perrycountynews.com/todaysnews/rss.xml en School-board performance http://www.perrycountynews.com/content/school-board-performance <img src="http://www.perrycountynews.com/sites/www.perrycountynews.com/files/imagecache/thumb85/perry_central_1_0.jpg" alt="Perry Central students Jessica Harding, next photo, and Cheyenne Austin, above, perform at last week’s school board meeting. They and other students who qualified for the upcoming state Solo and Ensemble Competition performed for the board and administrators. The event provided a pre-finals rehearsal for the group and solo performers. A video clip of the performance can be viewed on the News’ Facebook page. " title="Perry Central students Jessica Harding, next photo, and Cheyenne Austin, above, perform at last week’s school board meeting. They and other students who qualified for the upcoming state Solo and Ensemble Competition performed for the board and administrators. The event provided a pre-finals rehearsal for the group and solo performers. A video clip of the performance can be viewed on the News’ Facebook page. " align="left" hspace="6" width="94" height="85" /> Commissioners greet Perry Central seniors http://www.perrycountynews.com/content/commissioners-greet-perry-central-seniors <p> By STUART CASSIDY</p> <p> Staff Writer</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> LEOPOLD &ndash; Seniors at Perry Central High School got a first-hand look at county government Tuesday as the Board of Commissioners held its bimonthly meeting at the school. Moving quickly through the agenda, votes were presented with brief explanations as to why the matters were of importance.</p> <p> Speaking to &ldquo;the future of Perry County,&rdquo; Commissioner Larry James said the session was intended to &ldquo;give you guys a taste of what happens in county government.&rdquo;</p> Citizens police academy planned http://www.perrycountynews.com/content/citizens-police-academy-planned <p> By VINCE LUECKE</p> <p> Editor</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> PERRY COUNTY &ndash; A soon-to-form citizens police academy will offer a behind-the-scenes look at local law enforcement. While participants won&rsquo;t get a badge or a set of handcuffs, they will learn about how local police agencies work and will get to meet officers who work to protect the community.</p> Too many drivers ignoring Main and Humboldt stop sign http://www.perrycountynews.com/content/too-many-drivers-ignoring-main-and-humboldt-stop-sign <p> By VINCE LUECKE</p> <p> Editor</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> TELL CITY &ndash; Mayor Jim Adams seldom loses his cool at meetings but the topic of how to get drivers to obey the stop sign at Main and Humboldt streets gets him animated quickly.</p> Leading the rhythm: Guitarist’s riffs a muse for the future http://www.perrycountynews.com/content/leading-rhythm-guitarist%E2%80%99s-riffs-muse-future <img src="http://www.perrycountynews.com/sites/www.perrycountynews.com/files/imagecache/thumb85/hall_john.jpg" alt="Guitarist John Hall contemplates returning to playing music with young musicians, potentially inspiring the next generation taking up the craft." title="Guitarist John Hall contemplates returning to playing music with young musicians, potentially inspiring the next generation taking up the craft." align="left" hspace="6" width="99" height="85" /><p> &nbsp;</p> <p> By JAKE BETHEL</p> <p> Feature Writer</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> TROY &ndash; After playing guitar for over 50 years, Perry Countian John Hall doesn&rsquo;t play as many gigs as he used to, but music still holds a crucial place in his heart and mind.</p> <p> After performing for several years in bars and local shows in and around Perry County, Hall has cut out such gigs for the most part.</p> A heroin addict’s last hurrah http://www.perrycountynews.com/content/heroin-addict%E2%80%99s-last-hurrah <img src="http://www.perrycountynews.com/sites/www.perrycountynews.com/files/imagecache/thumb85/jarvis.jpg" alt="Kelly Jarvis often takes this photo collage with her to display during talks she gives to students about her daughter, Erin. Jarvis says it epitomizes who Erin was, a competitive athlete, the leg braces a harbinger of her future addiction. " title="Kelly Jarvis often takes this photo collage with her to display during talks she gives to students about her daughter, Erin. Jarvis says it epitomizes who Erin was, a competitive athlete, the leg braces a harbinger of her future addiction. " align="left" hspace="6" width="128" height="85" /><p> <em>Editor&rsquo;s Note: Scott Saalman of Jasper, a (Dubois County) Herald columnist, went to Tell City High School with Kelly Tucker Jarvis. Here, Kelly tells the story of her daughter&rsquo;s opioid use and heroin addiction that led to her death two years ago in Evansville. This column was distributed by the Hoosier State Press Association&rsquo;s Information Network. </em></p> <p> &nbsp;</p> Rome Courthouse future discussed http://www.perrycountynews.com/content/rome-courthouse-future-discussed <img src="http://www.perrycountynews.com/sites/www.perrycountynews.com/files/imagecache/thumb85/rome.jpg" alt="In hopes of stabilizing the Rome Courthouse prior to its 200th birthday in 2019, representatives from the community are seeking ways to fund a roofing project. According to Jim Carter, the existing metal roof is “deteriorating terribly” and is expected to cost upward of $20,000 to replace. In asking for the county’s assistance in finding state or federal funding to bankroll a project, Carter also reached out to the students of Perry Central, requesting that they participate in efforts to “save our Rome Courthouse.” He said much of the Rome community who has previously taken on such initiative is quite advanced in age and the reins of preserving the county’s history needs to be passed on to the next generation. Those interested in donating to preservation efforts should contact Judy Lorenz at (812) 836-4495." title="In hopes of stabilizing the Rome Courthouse prior to its 200th birthday in 2019, representatives from the community are seeking ways to fund a roofing project. According to Jim Carter, the existing metal roof is “deteriorating terribly” and is expected to cost upward of $20,000 to replace. In asking for the county’s assistance in finding state or federal funding to bankroll a project, Carter also reached out to the students of Perry Central, requesting that they participate in efforts to “save our Rome Courthouse.” He said much of the Rome community who has previously taken on such initiative is quite advanced in age and the reins of preserving the county’s history needs to be passed on to the next generation. Those interested in donating to preservation efforts should contact Judy Lorenz at (812) 836-4495." align="left" hspace="6" width="95" height="85" /> A doozie of a job http://www.perrycountynews.com/content/doozie-job <img src="http://www.perrycountynews.com/sites/www.perrycountynews.com/files/imagecache/thumb85/schaefer_working.jpg" alt="A Tell City automotive landmark, of such, is undergoing a much needed rehab. Built in the 1870s, and where automotive parts have been sold since 1936, now gone is the long-standing mural on the north-facing wall at Schaefer and Paulin’s auto parts store. Nearly 40 feet of the original brick wall had to be removed because after 140 years of sturdy support, it had started to heave and was unstable. In its place, a new foundation was poured and a reinforced by a panel of concrete block. To maintain the historic appearance, a brick veneer was applied. Pictured, masons Todd Arnold, left, and Chad Cronin, having meticulously measured to ensure everything is in alignment, adhere the bricks with a mortar compound. On the job for more than two weeks, the men said the project should be complete this week. Store proprietors said once the masons finish up, plans also include commissioning of a new sign to be painted." title="A Tell City automotive landmark, of such, is undergoing a much needed rehab. Built in the 1870s, and where automotive parts have been sold since 1936, now gone is the long-standing mural on the north-facing wall at Schaefer and Paulin’s auto parts store. Nearly 40 feet of the original brick wall had to be removed because after 140 years of sturdy support, it had started to heave and was unstable. In its place, a new foundation was poured and a reinforced by a panel of concrete block. To maintain the historic appearance, a brick veneer was applied. Pictured, masons Todd Arnold, left, and Chad Cronin, having meticulously measured to ensure everything is in alignment, adhere the bricks with a mortar compound. On the job for more than two weeks, the men said the project should be complete this week. Store proprietors said once the masons finish up, plans also include commissioning of a new sign to be painted." align="left" hspace="6" width="127" height="85" />