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Opinion

  • A few weeks ago I stumbled across an article about one organization's efforts to assist in the Gulf oil spill cleanup.

    The organization, Matter of Trust, is an ecological public charity that was asking for the public's help in collecting human and animal hair (dog, cat, alpaca, sheep) along with nylons to make oil booms.

    Feeling helpless here in southern Indiana, I thought it would be a good way for our community to get involved with their cause.

  • Editor's Note: A Quality of Life Committee working under the auspices of the Perry County Development Corp. is partnering with The News to present stories of people who have moved to Perry County or who have returned here after several years away. Nancy Myers penned this month's view.

    I moved to Perry County almost nine years ago to work for the Hoosier National Forest in Tell City. I came from a national forest in Arizona near Phoenix that was very busy.

  • Last Monday was the longest day of the year, meaning the summer solstice had arrived and the sun was as high in the sky as it could go. I spent Monday slaving behind my desk but I did my best the previous Saturday and Sunday to take advantage of just about every minute of daylight. Come nightfall Sunday, my bones ached but I felt a bit of satisfaction.

  • One of the wonderful results of publishing your e-mail address on a Web site, as we at The News do, is that people anywhere in the world can find it and send us stuff. I get all kinds of news releases from people I've never met, promoting products, services, events and ideas I could never dream up by myself.

    For example, I had heard of Take Your Daughter to Work Day, and just like you, had kept quiet about its inherent constitutional issues. But I wasn't aware until Monday that someone had come up with Take Your Dog To Work Day, which happens Friday.

  • Will Koch made headlines in 2006 with the Voyage, a wooden roller coaster that not only has been ranked the best ride of its type in the world, but helped grow Holiday World & Splashin' Safari. The ride's name can be applied to Koch, who died suddenly June 13. Though his voyage through life ended long before it should have, all those who knew Will know he made dreams come true, his own and those of countless others.

  • Many of you saw the comments made by Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels recently when he said the next president "would have to call a truce on the so-called social issues" so he or she could focus on the fiscal problems facing the country.

    As I've made clear, I really like Gov. Daniels, and I consider him a friend and colleague, but his comments mirror those of the GOP establishment who view values voters dismissively as "single-minded."

  • The United States economy is in dire trouble. With an ever-devaluing currency, an enormous trade deficit and virtually no growth in production, we are teetering on the brink of the greatest depression ever.

    We are well on our way - according to Bloomberg News, jobless claims rose by 12,000 to an all-time high of 472,000 June 12. Steven Ricchiuto, chief economist at Mizuho Securities said, "If you really are going to have a sustainable recovery, you need the labor market to improve."        

  • "Why does The Perry County News have to publish garbage in order to sell papers?" a reader asked on our Web site, www.perrycountynews.com.

    I have to confess, the reader was right about us wanting to sell newspapers. Please buy several copies whenever you can, even if you have a subscription. Think of the children.

  • The original "A-Team" TV show was a bit before my time, so I only know of the group of renegade commandos from the occasional rerun, but more so from the parodies of the show (an episode of "Family Guy" comes to mind).

    I'm pretty sure I'm the key demographic for this film, then, because the film gets so ridiculous at times that you might think it actually is making fun of the old show. This is not a bad thing. It just means that "The A-Team" is aware of what it should be: a crazy, fun action movie.

  • In Thursday's B section, we published a picture of a few 4-H Shamrock members spending the morning cleaning the Windy Creek Perry County Greenway on the north side of Tell City. Youth from Deer Creek Baptist Church recently cleaned Sunset Park in Tell City, helping prepare that area for last Monday's groundbreaking for a new riverwalk project.

  • Tell City's Schweizer Fest isn't that far off and it's time for The News to begin working on the 2010 Schweizer Zeitung, the special section we publish in early August.

  • Those who opposed the health-care bill are currently debating whether "repeal and replace" should be the clarion call in the coming election.

    Regardless of how this debate turns out, those in favor of doing better should focus their immediate attention on identifying and fixing the most harmful parts of the legislation. The new Independent Payment Advisory Board should be a top target.

  • "Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time," the latest video-game adaptation, is not likely to change anyone's mind regarding the video-game-as-movie genre. I actually enjoy a few of the hated video-game adaptations, but this film was just a bland experience. It's not terrible, but it's certainly not consistently entertaining.

  • If you're a voter, you'll be asked in November if you want to help change the Indiana Constitution.

    Property-tax caps that have been the subject of numerous news stories, several here and many elsewhere, survived the first of the steps, in 2008 and this year, required to get them into the state's most important document.

    Step 3 is yours to handle, as a voter in November's election.

  • I didn't recognize the guy in the pickup truck and while he didn't seem to pay much attention to the activities under way in City Hall Park May 30, his innocent drive-by on the Sunday before Memorial Day helped me. He left me with a new understanding of just how lucky we are to live in a nation where we can do pretty much what we want.

  • Today is Memorial Day, a day set aside since 1868 to honor and remember our nation's veterans.

    Then it was called Decoration Day and was established by an organization of Union veterans called the Grand Army of the Republic.

    The first observance was held at Arlington National Cemetery, where officials including Gen. Ulysses S. Grant presided over ceremonies. Children from the Soldiers' and Sailors' Orphan Home and members of GAR made their way through the cemetery reciting prayers and singing hymns while putting flowers on Union and Confederate graves.

  • Not everyone believes in purgatory, that place between heaven and hell where sinners are purged of their wrongdoings.

    Though it's been a long time since I sat through a catechism class, Catholics are still taught that purgatory exists and for people like me who harbor more than a few not-yet-atoned-for sins, purgatory sure beats that other place. While the sign over it marks it as a one-way entrance through which people never leave, purgatory isn't a place for all eternity. It's like a busy doctor's office. Eventually your name gets called.

  • Editor's Note: A Quality of Life Committee working under the auspices of the Perry County Development Corp. is partnering with The News to present the stories of people who have moved to Perry County or who have returned here after several years away. This column was written by Chad James.

    In 1991, I moved away from Perry County, excited to begin my college years at Purdue University. The previous 18 years were spent largely with family. My mother had 13 siblings and my father had 11.  

  • (Shhhhh ... don't tell Indiana.)

    The state received a notice early this month that it again earned a failing grade for educating its preschool children.

    Because it doesn't.

    Indiana's top education officials only recently realized, apparently, that children of kindergarten age can and should be learning, if, that is, the kids want to walk into their first day of first grade without looking, well, uneducated.

  • In seven years it is projected that people in the world over age 65 will outnumber those under age 5 for the first time in history.

    Fortunately for our society, older people in nearly every walk of life are more active and productive than their counterparts were a generation ago. Many say age 60 is the new 40 and age 80 is the new 60, and there is some evidence to back those claims.