.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Opinion

  • Patriots rose to the occasion last week, mustering from homes and farms to honor the life of a fallen brother.

    They lined Tell City’s streets Thursday as the cortege carrying the flag-draped coffin of Barry Jarvis made its slow journey to Deer Creek Church. Students, store workers, old men and women, even preschool students stood outside, watching and weeping. Many held flags and placed hands over their hearts.

  • Tuesday marks the 69th anniversary of the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor. This  editorial was written by Cannelton News Editor Bob Cummings and published Dec. 6, 1960. At that time, the county was home to hundreds of World War II veterans. The number of living vets who fought in the war are far fewer today, but the relevance of Pearl Harbor Day remains. Cummings’ editorial is published here in its original words.

    Cannelton News Editorial Published Dec. 6, 1960

  • Thursday saw Congress sign a new childhood nutrition bill that will now be presented to President Obama to sign into law. You may have heard of the bill; it’s the same one First Lady Michelle Obama is backing in which new nutrition standards will be set for foods sold in schools. According to TheHill.com, the $4.5 million bill will also expand the eligibility of children in need to participate in school-meal programs and give schools a 6-cent increase to help cafeterias serve healthier meals.

  • Thanksgiving leftovers may still be with us, but Black Friday is gone and along with it the hoopla, big sales and crowded stores. What is left is a Christmas season with 26 days left.

    While plenty of gifts were purchased over the weekend, most of us still have plenty of shopping to do and we encourage our readers to do most of that here at home in Perry County.

  • Watching government at work is a lot like watching children interact. First, we have elections, which are contests to see who can grab the most power. A burst piñata springs quickly to mind in looking for a similar event in childhood. Votes are the candy, and many of those grappling for them will resort to any measure necessary to ensure they gather the most.

  • The Cannelton Library’s recent decision to pursue a merger with the Tell City-Perry County Library is good news for patrons of both in the short term, but there could be problems in the future.

    Both library buildings would remain open, and patrons of each would have access to all the volumes of both. Though the Tell City library is larger, each has some books that the other does not. So that means patrons of both libraries would have more choices of reading material.

  • Now that midterm elections are over, the elected politicians will be expected to carry out their constituents’ demands. But it’s difficult to even understand what those demands are. Did people vote for a candidate because they voted straight ticket or based on one issue such as abortion, gun control or states’ rights?

    We do know the issues that were discussed in candidates’ speeches, debates and ads and can speculate those were the issues in voters’ minds when determining whom to vote for.

  • With the turning of the calendar to November comes a time to celebrate, give thanks and pay homage to those who helped in the foundation of our nation. November may be the one month of the year when Native Americans play a prominent role in our thinking due to the history of the Thanksgiving holiday, but American Indian heritage goes well beyond the role of European helper.

    This month is Native American Heritage Month. It’s a time to recognize the various nations that called the lands of America home long before European settlers arrived on the shores.

  • Many white people avoid neighborhoods where the residents are predominantly black. Many black people know to avoid certain white neighborhoods.

    Racism has not disappeared from America, and isn’t likely to for a very long time.

    So we were not surprised to learn that a news analyst for National Public Radio said, “when I get on a plane, I got to tell you, if I see people who are in Muslim garb and I think, you know, they are identifying themselves first and foremost as Muslims, I get worried. I get nervous.”

  • As Election Day draws near, candidates for local races will be stepping up their efforts to win your votes. We hope Perry County’s voters will take the time in the coming days to devote the time and attention voting demands before going to the polls Nov. 2 or taking part in early voting already under way.

  • A recent Associated Press article about Indiana’s new law requiring everyone, regardless of age, to show a photo identification when buying carryout alcohol included good news and bad news.

    The good news is AP quoted several Indiana legislators who say they are ready to revamp the law, which took effect July 1.

    Legislators and liquor store workers told the AP they’ve heard many complaints.

  • United Way of Perry County’s yearly funding drive is under way. The success of the group’s efforts depends on each of us. This year’s campaign hopes to raise $125,000 for support groups that provide a wide range of services within our community

  • As far as we know, we could have "Professional Murderer" printed on our business cards, and we'll have committed no crime.

    An investment professional advertising him- or herself as specializing in retirement planning, however, can suffer a $10,000 fine and license revocation for advertising that service.

  • "People get the government they deserve." So the old adage goes. Recent events in Bell, Calif., are proving this 200-year-old quote to be right.

    People there are outraged that their elected officials have salaries higher that the president of the United States. I have been in contact with a journalist covering the story and he tells me that these officials have been in office quite awhile for the most part, one at least 26 years.

  • Though we're still in the middle of a hot summer, autumn isn't far off and our staff's thoughts are beginning to turn toward November and Veterans Day. We plan to publish a special veteran's edition of the newspaper this year, and we need the help of our readers. Most of us know someone, living or dead, who has served in the armed forces. All you need to do to have your favorite veteran featured in The Perry County News is send us a photo of that veteran, along with some basic information.

  • The people I go to bed with can get pretty noisy. Sometimes it's downright embarrassing.

    I don't mind a little chitchat once the lights are off, but some of the people jabbering in my ear just won't quit about how their day went, where they dined for supper or even who else they're dating!

    To be honest, the men and women whose voices I listen to from my pillow are police officers, dispatchers and the occasional pilot on barges plying the Ohio River or aircraft soaring high over New Boston.

  • Cannelton City Schools, citing a "funding shortage," seeks Cannelton voters' approval of a special tax increase of $.41 per $100 of assessed valuation. In the interest of having complete data on which to make an informed decision on such an important issue, the following is submitted:

    According to the Indiana Department of Local Government Finance, the City of Cannelton's tax rates for the last three years are as indicated below:

    Year    Total Tax Rate

    2008    $2.9909

    2009    $3.2623

  • General Motors announced last week that it is purchasing AmeriCredit Inc. so that it can make more subprime auto loans.

    Considering that GM was one of several companies bailed out by American taxpayers last year and that losses on subprime loans were largely responsible for those companies' problems, we think this is the wrong message for GM to be sending.

  • Programs for the 52nd Schweizer Fest were in last week's News and copies are available at our office and businesses across the city. Two events I'd like to plug are the street-car parade Wednesday, Aug. 11, and the Saturday, Aug. 14, diaper derby. For years, both events have been on my Schweizer Fest beat.

    The number of participants in the street-car parade, which falls on the Wednesday-evening kickoff to the festival, varies year to year, and since it takes a little time for youngsters and their adult helpers to prepare the entries, now's the time to begin working.

  • When you watch as many movies as I do, you start to see patterns in every genre and things get very boring. I went into "Salt," the latest Angelina Jolie spy film, expecting a typical, safe movie that would be completely forgettable. I was pleasantly surprised to see an exciting action film that does not play it safe, but rather goes all out. "Salt" is not a great film or anything, but it is a film that takes risks and usually succeeds.