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Opinion

  • The United States is the world’s greatest military power, but is it our job to be the world’s policeman and interfere in internal affairs of other sovereign nations?

    And by starting military action in Libya while we already have forces engaged in Iraq and Afghanistan, are we stretching the U.S. military, not to mention the federal government’s budget, too thin?

    Those are questions we think should have been thoroughly debated in Congress before President Obama made the decision to start military action in Libya without congressional approval.

  • The state officials most responsible for ensuring Indiana’s children are educated seem to be doing all they can to stifle the process most likely to ensure the state’s prosperity.

    High-schoolers who are able will get the chance to move ahead to college a year early if Senate Bill 497 makes it into law. That’s wonderful, but it will affect the schools those students will leave behind.

  • Recent headlines about the seizure of dogs from a Perry County man’s home generated plenty of buzz and an outpouring of concern and assistance for those rescued animals.

    We hope the positive response helps generate long-term support for efforts to prevent similar cases of animal abuse or neglect in the future. But for that to happen, more of us need to get involved in helping control our local pet population and supporting advocates who want to put in place common-sense measures to protect animals.

  • When the NCAA started requiring 820 SAT or 68 ACT scores for freshmen to be eligible for college sports, longtime college basketball coach Jerry Tarkanian predicted that there would be cheating on those standardized tests to make star athletes eligible.

    He’s been proven correct in several cases. The most notable one involved current NBA star Derrick Rose, who led Memphis University to the NCAA men’s Division I championship game in his only season there.

  • Tell City-Troy Township School Board member Dr. Gene Ress expressed conflicting and misguided messages when he addressed a small crowd at a school-board meeting Tuesday.

    The gist of his message: Fellow board member Sherri Flynn did nothing illegal when she talked in an open meeting about the board’s hiring of new Schools Superintendent Lynn Blinzinger, but board members shouldn’t share with the public anything that occurs in executive sessions.

  • It’s no secret that Hoosiers – and Hoosier politicians – disagree on the roles labor unions should play in the 21st century work place. So-called right-to-work legislation in the Indiana House was effectively killed last month after Democrat lawmakers in that body left the state, literally. In doing so, they denied that body a quorum and added Indiana to a list of states in which lawmakers have fled their seats to stop legislation they opposed.

  • It can’t be said enough times. Politicians need to put aside party politics and start reaching across the aisles for compromise.

    If the past decade has taught us anything, it’s that our politicians need to wake up, listen to the people and start taking suggestions instead of fighting.

    Recent disagreements in Wisconsin and in our own state have seen a slightly disturbing event occur; Democrats refusing to vote on issues and fleeing state capitals for hiding instead of debating the issues at hand.

  • That our public school system has severe flaws is a popular premise in government and among many education reformers. And $300 million in recent spending cuts to Indiana’s public schools necessitated by the state’s need to balance its recession-riddled budget certainly haven’t helped solve the schools’ problems.

  • In the usual scheme of things, a sickness enters a body, then spreads. In the body known as the Tell City-Troy Township School Corp. Board of School Trustees, we may have just seen the beginning of a reverse process.

    To say the board as a governing body is ill might take the metaphor too far, but we would like to see others catch what Flynn took to their table Tuesday.

  • The Perry County Council will meet Wednesday evening to discuss changes to the retirement fund currently offered to deputies employed by the county sheriff’s department. As The News has reported, Sheriff Lee Chestnut wants the county to fund a transition from the current program under the Indiana Public Employees Retirement Fund to another geared toward police officers and firefighters.

  • Alabama publisher NewSouth Books announced at the beginning of January that the company would publish a version of the Mark Twain classic “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” without any of the offensive terms, including the “n-word” which appears in the original novel 219 times.

  • One of famed cowboy philosopher Will Rogers’ best known quotes is his reply when asked which political party he belonged to. “I’m not a member of any organized political party — I’m a Democrat,” he said.

    One might say the same thing about both major American parties now, as one would not expect an organized party to try to overthrow some of its most powerful and respected members.

  • We agree with Gov. Mitch Daniels’ assertion in his State of the State Address last week that the state has no more critical a duty than educating its children.

    We disagree, however, on one of the methods he touts as an improvement to public education.

  • Two announcements from City Hall over the past week give us hope that Tell City’s downtown has a bright future.

    A story in last Thursday’s issue reported on the likely sale of the former Dat’s Kajun restaurant to Historic Landmarks Foundation of Indiana, a nonprofit group dedicated to preserving buildings with significant history or architectural value. Many of us remember the building at the corner of Main and Pestalozzi streets as the Glow Room Tavern and we’ve all seen the imposing structure’s gradual decline over the past few years.

  • As we turn the final page on one year and begin another, it’s natural to look forward to the months ahead, as well as recall the events of the past year.

    We would like to mark the new year by extending our thanks to the men and women who left public office last week. Without a doubt they served us well.

  • Editor’s Note: In the months before the Christmas of 1897, an 8-year-old girl named Virginia O’Hanlon wrote a letter to the New York Sun, asking if there really was a Santa Claus. Edward P. Mitchell gave the assignment to Francis P. Church, whose reply to Virginia appeared in the Sept. 21, 1897, edition of the Sun. Virginia’s letter and Church’s reply, as it appeared in the Sun, are reprinted below. Virginia O’Hanlon Douglas died May 13, 1971.

    Is there a Santa Claus?

  • Patriots rose to the occasion last week, mustering from homes and farms to honor the life of a fallen brother.

    They lined Tell City’s streets Thursday as the cortege carrying the flag-draped coffin of Barry Jarvis made its slow journey to Deer Creek Church. Students, store workers, old men and women, even preschool students stood outside, watching and weeping. Many held flags and placed hands over their hearts.

  • Tuesday marks the 69th anniversary of the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor. This  editorial was written by Cannelton News Editor Bob Cummings and published Dec. 6, 1960. At that time, the county was home to hundreds of World War II veterans. The number of living vets who fought in the war are far fewer today, but the relevance of Pearl Harbor Day remains. Cummings’ editorial is published here in its original words.

    Cannelton News Editorial Published Dec. 6, 1960

  • Thursday saw Congress sign a new childhood nutrition bill that will now be presented to President Obama to sign into law. You may have heard of the bill; it’s the same one First Lady Michelle Obama is backing in which new nutrition standards will be set for foods sold in schools. According to TheHill.com, the $4.5 million bill will also expand the eligibility of children in need to participate in school-meal programs and give schools a 6-cent increase to help cafeterias serve healthier meals.

  • Thanksgiving leftovers may still be with us, but Black Friday is gone and along with it the hoopla, big sales and crowded stores. What is left is a Christmas season with 26 days left.

    While plenty of gifts were purchased over the weekend, most of us still have plenty of shopping to do and we encourage our readers to do most of that here at home in Perry County.