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Opinion

  • "Unacceptable" is the best adjective to describe the escape of two prisoners from Branchville Correctional Facility. To put that another way, we will not tolerate killers and other violent criminals wandering freely in our community.

    Also unacceptable is the failure of a prison-escape-alert system to do its job.

  • Spring has arrived and while all the rain has made it a chore to enjoy the outdoors, the warmer weather has perked up my spirits over the past few days.

    Driving last week after a shower, the spring frogs living in pools of water along Indiana 545 were going mad with their croakings, either celebrating spring or looking for mates.

  • Since the late 1800s the world has come together every two years in the spirit of athletic competition. The best of the best pitting strength, agility and speed against each other during the Olympic games. During these games athletes of all nations, races, religions and cultures put differences aside to test not only their own abilities, but to bring glory to their home countries.

  • I am responding to the March 24 editorial in The Perry County News that makes references to several articles written about the Clintons. I found the editorial appalling and a one-sided approach to this upcoming election.

    Your paper seems to be in lockstep with most of the national media in an obvious attempt to spin everything in a negative and biased way against the Clinton camp.

  • Stay out of the kitchen. I'm reminded of that old adage while catching hell for something in the paper. My backside has been warmed lately for a pair of stories. But that's nothing new really. I still hear complaints about stories published years ago, old grudges some people wear like chips on their shoulders.

    I received two calls about the front-page story on last month's story on the D-Boys, the alleged gang blamed for beating up a Kentucky man. Police carted a few D-Boys to jail and the youth detention center and the cases are working their way through the justice system.

  • If you watch any of the old television shows from the 1950s, one of the attractions is the "new cars" driven by the characters. Those '57 Chevys, '56 Caddies, '58 Fords, and '59 Vettes that are considered ultra-classics these days were the cars you bought right from the dealer's showrooms in those days.

    Today, they cost many times what they did then.

  • In 2007 it came to the attention of the Humane Society of Perry County that there is a growing problem in Cannelton, Tell City and Troy, with feral alley cats. These feral cats that are not claimed are living all over the county and breeding beyond control.

    We have had numerous discussions with some officials concerning this problem and it is now time for those who are in power to act. No one seems to have the perfect solution.

  • When Bill Clinton was president, his wife, Hillary, charged that allegations of wrongdoings by him were the result of "a vast right-wing conspiracy."

    But now she and her husband seem to be orchestrating a left-wing conspiracy against her current rival for the Democratic presidential nomination, Sen. Barack Obama of Illinois.

  • Every morning and night, leaving from and returning to home, I roll down my car's driver's-side window half way and listen for the goose on the lake below my house. The big white-plumed bird never fails to offer a honk or two, either welcoming me home or saying goodbye.

  • Gov. Mitch Daniels announced in October that a social studies category will be added to Indiana's statewide testing program for school children, known as ISTEP, for grades 4, 6 and 8 when the test moves to spring.

    That subject had previously been totally ignored in the tests. But a national study released last month sponsored by Common Core, a new nonpartisan group pushing for the liberal arts in public school curriculums, indicates it's not a moment too soon to be adding this vital subject.

  • While Indiana's property-tax system continues to be highly scrutinized at the Statehouse, leaders must remember that true tax transformation requires that government spending decrease. Every government process should be inspected for efficiency, and our local-election process should be no different. To lower local taxes, local government should be allowed to choose vote-center elections as a substitute for precinct-based elections.

  • No one can fault Ron Etienne; he worked hard to get the public involved in discussions about improvements needed in Tell City's aging junior-high and high-school buildings. His efforts in that regard began when, in late 2006, the schools superintendent launched processes to get those improvements started.

    Members of the public began appearing at school-board meetings. The first among them stood up to commend Etienne and the school board for taking action that could restore pride in the schools and the city.

  • Editor's Note: This guest column by Tell City Electric Department Superintendent Marlow Smethurst is in response to Jack Joyce's column published in Monday's News concerning the Tell City Electric Department's request for an increase in rates and charges. Smethurst responds to Joyce's comments, point by point.

  • More than two decades of successful management of the Tell City Electric Department qualifies me, and makes it my duty, to speak out on the current request for an increase in rates and charges for the Tell City Electric Department.

  • Headlines running across the pages of the newspaper haven't been all that blissful the past several months, with weekly reports of methamphetamine labs busted by police. And just last week we reported on the arrests of four people, two adults and two juveniles, on criminal-gang activity.

    Scattered amid that news have been stories about the impact of proposed local-government reform and its possible impact on tax rates, frequent home foreclosures and sheriff's sales, proposed utility-rate increases and efforts last year by Tell City to annex outlying areas.

  • Depending on the results of this week's big primaries in Texas and Ohio, Hoosier Democrats may or may not have a say in deciding this year's Democratic nominee for president. That's a shame and our state's leaders, of both major parties, need to find a way to give Indiana more relevance in choosing nominees for president.

    The way we see it, that could mean moving up our state's primary date from May to February or March, or working with other states to create rotating regional primaries.

  • Feb. 29, as most of us know, rolls around only once each four years. Friday is the big day and while most of us will go about our daily routine without much thought to the extra day the calendar has given us, we shouldn't let it pass without trying to do something a little special. After all, four years is a long time to wait for the next Feb. 29.

  • Thursday's News reported that funds to improve a four-block area of Main Street are running dry, leaving only one block with the amenities many of us were hoping would come to all four blocks included in the project.

  • It's Lent and I've been doing my very best to keep up ages-old Christian tradition of giving up something to mark the spiritual significance of the 40 days before Easter.

    My sacrifice isn't huge: I've ditched the television for the most part, allowing myself only 30 minutes of news in the morning and evening. Instead of watching movies or the National Geographic Channel, I've been trying to read more, blowing off dust from books I only glanced over during my seminary days. I've come to enjoy the quiet time.

  • The Fourth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States of America reads, "The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized."