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Opinion

  • Headlines running across the pages of the newspaper haven't been all that blissful the past several months, with weekly reports of methamphetamine labs busted by police. And just last week we reported on the arrests of four people, two adults and two juveniles, on criminal-gang activity.

    Scattered amid that news have been stories about the impact of proposed local-government reform and its possible impact on tax rates, frequent home foreclosures and sheriff's sales, proposed utility-rate increases and efforts last year by Tell City to annex outlying areas.

  • Depending on the results of this week's big primaries in Texas and Ohio, Hoosier Democrats may or may not have a say in deciding this year's Democratic nominee for president. That's a shame and our state's leaders, of both major parties, need to find a way to give Indiana more relevance in choosing nominees for president.

    The way we see it, that could mean moving up our state's primary date from May to February or March, or working with other states to create rotating regional primaries.

  • Feb. 29, as most of us know, rolls around only once each four years. Friday is the big day and while most of us will go about our daily routine without much thought to the extra day the calendar has given us, we shouldn't let it pass without trying to do something a little special. After all, four years is a long time to wait for the next Feb. 29.

  • Thursday's News reported that funds to improve a four-block area of Main Street are running dry, leaving only one block with the amenities many of us were hoping would come to all four blocks included in the project.

  • It's Lent and I've been doing my very best to keep up ages-old Christian tradition of giving up something to mark the spiritual significance of the 40 days before Easter.

    My sacrifice isn't huge: I've ditched the television for the most part, allowing myself only 30 minutes of news in the morning and evening. Instead of watching movies or the National Geographic Channel, I've been trying to read more, blowing off dust from books I only glanced over during my seminary days. I've come to enjoy the quiet time.

  • The Fourth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States of America reads, "The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized."

  • Editor's Note: Former Indiana Gov. Joe Kernan served as co-chair of the recent Indiana Commission on Local Government Reform with Indiana Supreme Court Chief Justice Randall Shepard. In the first of a two-part interview with representatives of the Indiana Chamber of Commerce, Kernan shares his thoughts on how the state's property-tax plight and need for more responsible local government are intertwined and why the current local government structure does not work.

  • I'm tired of writing about methamphetamine. I'm sick of hearing about the drug and the police reports and telephone calls about people caught making it, using it or buying the ingredients that make the stuff.

  • We editorialized last summer that adding more events to the Schweizer Fest would help increase attendance at Tell City's annual celebration. So we were pleased to hear that the 2008 fest will include a musical play again after none was held in 2007 for the first time in 21 years.

    The play chosen for this year is "1776," a story about the founding of the United States that was generally well received when it was released as a Broadway play and a movie.

  • I nearly bit the dust the other day. Or should I say I nearly bit the ice. I was walking down the sidewalk from my house to the mailbox with letters Sunday evening when my right foot found a small patch just a few inches in width. Both feet suddenly came out from under me, the letters in my hand flew skyward and I came crashing down back first on the hard concrete.

  • The Indiana Senate passed Senate Bill 235 last week. If adopted, the law would allow counties to create new voting centers which would let residents cast their ballots at one location, regardless of which precinct they live in.

  • The elderly man hunched over from age, shuffling down the sidewalk. The older lady in the wheelchair with oxygen feeding through her nostrils.

    Those are the faces of heart disease in America, aren't they?

    Look at the face on this column mug. A healthy-looking 40-year-old woman. That's also the face of heart disease and a heart-attack survivor.

  • Each year, the Indiana Department of Education, schools and newspapers across the state work together to publish education report cards for our local communities.

    The annual performance reports are one part of a continuing effort to encourage Hoosiers to become more knowledgeable about their schools and for schools to become more accountable to the public they serve.

    The reports include the most recent data available on test scores, attendance and graduation rates, school safety, teacher salaries, expenditures and more.

  • I suspect I'm not alone in occasionally pondering what Perry County may look like one or two decades from now.

    A recent meeting of the Perry County Convention and Visitors Bureau, reported on the front page of Thursday's News, sparked my imagination yet again with discussion of how the county's location in the state and its good highways give it advantages in attracting tourists.

  • By midyear, close to 35 million American families should have a little extra cash to spend, thanks to a quickly negotiated plan of tax rebates our government's leaders hope will stimulate a teetering U.S. economy.

  • What is it with drugs, anyway?

    Yet another meth lab has turned up in Tell City. Thinking about the presence of drugs and drug use in a small community such as ours, and how many other small and large communities throughout the United States are facing the same issues, is truly mind-boggling.

    Billions and billions of dollars of public money have been spent in the war on drugs over the past several decades, and yet, illegal drug use continues to be one of the biggest cash businesses in the United States. The question is, why?

  • An editorial published in the Jan. 14 News incorrectly reported payments to Cannelton firefighters as monthly. Regular members of the city's volunteer fire department receive $800 per year, plus $200 for clothing and fuel.

  • Although the Indiana General Assembly has been working since Jan. 8, most Statehouse observers feel the session doesn't begin until the governor delivers his annual State of the State speech.

    Gov. Mitch Daniels outlined his goals for 2008 in a half-hour speech in the Indiana House chamber Jan. 15 that focused on his plans to provide additional property-tax relief.

    The next day, the governor testified on his tax relief program (House Bill 1001) before the House Ways and Means Committee, the legislative panel that serves as the starting point on discussions.

  • Tell City's sesquicentennial is fast approaching and as you may have noticed at the bottom of today's front page, we've begun a countdown to the weeklong celebration's Aug. 2 opening day.

  • At his first council meeting as Cannelton's mayor, Morris "Smokey" Graves faced opposition to his decision to eliminate two positions from that city's fire department. The meeting seemed more like a one-man show than democracy when the mayor announced that assistant- and deputy-chief positions, held by Charlie Little and Johnny Young respectively, were being eliminated to streamline the fire department.