.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Opinion

  • As of Friday morning, a gallon of regular unleaded gasoline cost $4.09 at Circle S in Tell City. On average, Americans are paying more than $4 a gallon, which is $1 more than what we were paying this time last year. It's troublesome to see people lined up just to get gas for $3.96 because that's "cheap."

    We are all hurting from rising gas prices. No one is exempt, including industry and agriculture. And that means everything from food to entertainment costs are rising.

  • It's a big year for gardening as more and more value-conscious Americans fed up with high food prices set out to grow a bigger portion of the food they and their families eat. I'm trying to join the trend.

    As a rural area with a strong tradition of family farming and gardening, Perry Countians have long produced a lot of their own food, whether growing vegetables and fruits or butchering animals raised in local pastures.

  • We're going to spend $57,715 and hope for the best.

    That was the decision that emerged from a May 29 Perry County Redevelopment Commission meeting.

    We understand and appreciate the frustration its members expressed about needing to reroof a courthouse not yet 15 years old. We wish, however, that they'd gone a step beyond merely replacing the shingles.

    As we reported Thursday, a couple of members said they didn't want to authorize that work, knowing problems that led to leaks will remain, but felt it was their best option.

  • I arrived in Tell City's sister city with bells on. Actually the cows were wearing the bells. I was carrying a camera and ambitions of tracking down William Tell in this town in central Switzerland surrounded by mountains.

    Altdorf, which is German for "old village" is about Tell City's size, with a population in 2002 of 8,700. It's the capital of the Swiss canton of Uri. Switzerland is made up of 26 cantons or states making its official name Confoederatio Helvetica make sense. Swiss money and license plates carry the name or the abbreviation CH.

  • We editorialized against the death penalty 11 years ago, citing as one of our reasons the fact that innocent people are sometimes wrongly convicted. If they have been executed, there is no way to correct the mistake if they are later proved innocent.

    A news story last week from Melbourne, Australia, emphasized that point again.

  • To the citizens and taxpayers of the city of Cannelton: Since a reference has been made from the current mayor that the City of Cannelton has not progressed in the past 12 years, I find it now necessary to present facts as to the increased assets that have been added to the city from 1995 to the end of 2007.

    1. Community center, land and equipment, $1,254,680

    2. Fire station, trucks and equipment, $719,554.56

    3. Police equipment and cars, $93,096.90

    4. Library building and accessories, $600,013.06

  • Salami in Stuttgart, pork cutlets in Pforzheim and cucumbers and fish in Freiburg. Another German town, another fast meal. It's my travel-food tradition and last week was no different as I touched down in Munich and spent my first hard-saved euro on a meaty sandwich of lettuce, tomatoes and bacon.

    Just about every German train station has at least one sandwich kiosk - most have several - and I've been hooked on them for years. Traveling alone, I seldom sit down for lunch or supper and since I want to do and see as much as possible, I almost always eat on the go.

  • Today is Memorial Day, a day set aside since 1868 to honor and remember our nation's veterans.

    Then it was called Decoration Day and was established by an organization of Union veterans called the Grand Army of the Republic.

    The first observance was held at Arlington National Cemetery, where officials including Gen. Ulysses S. Grant presided over ceremonies. Children from the Soldiers' and Sailors' Orphan Home and members of GAR made their way through the cemetery reciting prayers and singing hymns while putting flowers on Union and Confederate graves.

  • My colleagues in Congress and I spent a majority of last week working on, debating and passing bills focused on stabilizing the housing market and strengthening our economy. The faltering housing market has affected all aspects of our economic state. Folks only need to drive around their neighborhoods or down the street to see its devastating effects. Odds are that one in 13 families is currently behind on their mortgage payments.

  • As each Perry County senior receives their diploma this week and next, changes are going to happen. No longer are you high-school students confined to an 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. schedule, a structured life of clubs, sports, school work and other obligations tied to school.

    Now is the time to really use what you've learned in those walls to make your decisions count even more than what they have. Experience new things. Go out, do things you never would have thought about doing.

  • Perry County's fourth-graders received quite an education Wednesday while taking part in the annual Old-Fashioned Day at the county fairgrounds.

    Several groups, including Purdue University's extension services in the county and Lincoln Hills Resource Conservation and Development Area help organize volunteers for a day of hands-on learning on what life in the past was like.

  • Perry County's response to animal-abandonment, -neglect and -cruelty problems, woefully inadequate not too long ago, has been developed over recent years into what can be described as a solid foundation. We have a state-of-the-art shelter, an animal-control-officer position and regulations he or she can cite in doing the job.

  • One of the biggest topics in Spencer County news for the past few weeks has been the future of the North Spencer Alternative Education Center, which provides, among other services, opportunities for adults to finish their high-school education and move onto post-secondary education.

    The North Spencer Alternative Center recently learned that it has the best director and the best adult learner in the state for 2007, and those are just a couple of the higher-profile accomplishments of the center.

  • I think the newspaper does a good job of extending thanks and congratulations to individuals and businesses who are recognized for their work, hard work and commitment to community.

    Many of the letters to the editor we publish each week voice thanks to our neighbors who lend their time, talent and treasure to various projects. Our Hometown Heroes feature published approximately every two weeks offers an opportunity to thank individuals who might not otherwise receive the thanks they deserve. But, sometimes, good works go unnoticed.

  • Voters should decide how much a candidate's age matters.

    Lately considerable attention has been focused on Sen. John McCain's age, with some saying he is too old to be president.

    If elected, McCain would be 72 at his inauguration, making him the oldest man to become president. If elected to a second term, he would be 80 at the end of it - also the oldest ever. Ronald Reagan, who was almost 78 when he finished his second term, is the oldest to serve as president so far.

  • How wonderful the earth is springing back to life in bloom, with more to come. Of course, all of the planted bulbs have bloomed, now the perennials and the flowering almond, with its wonderful full-pink flowers. Forsythia with its bright yellow blossoms with its green leaves is starting to encroach on the yellow, the airy white clusters of blossoms on the sarvis tree.

    Now, the redbud trees have joined the display with their purplish-pink blooms, with the dogwood and lilacs following. These are all beautiful while in bloom, but seem to be gone in a flash.

  • I'm again writing in hopes of saving our church building. St. Luke's Episcopal Church is located in the historic district of Cannelton. Courthouse records indicate the first deed on the two lots now held by the church was recorded Oct. 1, 1849.

    Predating the Civil War by a decade, this historic church stands today as the oldest public building in Cannelton.

    Beneath the church floors are tunnels, once leading toward the Ohio River but now sealed off, which enabled slaves to move via the Underground Railroad toward freedom.

  • I watched nursery workers plant an oak tree in front of the newspaper office Thursday. I had hoped it would go directly in front of my office window but it sits slightly to the south, easy to see when I'm sitting at my desk but out of sight when I'm front of my computer.

    I often watched robins and other birds that loved to eat berries and chat in the old tree that grew for years right outside my window.

  • Cities and towns have dealt with run-down homes, trashy yards and other neighborhood eyesores since people first started living next to one another.

  • America has suffered tremendous setbacks within the nightmare, train-wreck presidency of George Bush. Our dollar seems almost worthless and our government owes trillions of dollars, mostly to foreigners, for the first time in our history.

    Our economy is in shambles and we have almost no influence in the world past the reach of military, currently bogged down in an expensive and endless war.