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Opinion

  • St. Paul's mission to New Orleans in the summer of 2007 was an eye-opening experience filled with tears, laughter and memorable moments that cannot be experienced more than once.

    For these reasons, and many more, St. Paul's 2008 mission was a completely different experience.

  • Class reunions can create ambivalence in one's feelings. What is the emotional situation? Is the reunion a celebration of our longevity? Is the reunion a memorial for those not with us?

    It is hard for the mind to entertain two ideas at the same time, especially life and death. The most typical response when presented with a dilemma is to choose one alternative and defy a satisfactory solution to the emotional situation. Life and death are a kind of divine conflict - a dilemma to be solved if one is to become complete.

  • When asked to write a personal memoir of St. Paul's second mission to New Orleans, I assumed that it would be easy to assemble a few hundred words into an accurate depiction of my experience.

    But as I took the time to piece together all the tiny events that, when viewed collectively, made a breathtaking whole, I realized how unexpected my time spent in the bayou was.

  • I read with great interest the two articles on the front page of The Perry County News July 28, 2008, concerning Cannelton City Schools.

    Regarding the story headlined, "New law may spawn more school transfers," it is great news that apparently Indiana will soon join more than 40 other states in allowing parents to send their children to public schools outside of their own district.

  • Tell City's sesquicentennial celebration is in full march. Saturday's parade and community picnic are behind us and Kids' Day wrapped up Sunday evening. So what's next to do? Plenty.

    While some folks are free the entire week courtesy of retirement, summer break or timely vacations, most of us have to balance sesquicentennial events with the rest of our lives.

    Here are a few suggestions for each of the six remaining days of Tell City's 150-year festivities.

    Monday - Carl Hurley

  • If a stranger from afar were to enter Tell City right now, he'd catch on pretty quickly that we're in the midst of a celebration. He wouldn't have to investigate too deeply to find out what we're celebrating.

    We think he would find it obvious that a lot of pride has gone into preparing for our sesquicentennial party.

  • Come with me now, back in time, back before the Internet. I'm talking about way back, back before Nintendo or Sega, herpes or AIDS, school shootings or political correctness.

    When you could buy stuff from the store without safety caps and hermetic seals, because no one had to worry about being poisoned by a perfect stranger.

    I'm talking about back to homemade ice cream on a Sunday afternoon, hide-and-seek, Simon says, red-light-green-light, climbing trees and making forts.

  • Tell City's sesquicentennial is nearly upon us and the eight-day celebration of the city's founding, I'm sure, will be a grand success.

    As I pen this Friday morning, signs with historical photos of city landmarks are being placed across the downtown in preparation for historical society walking tours, grass along Main Street sidewalks is being mowed and the new banners of William Tell are glistening wet after a brief shower. Things are truly taking shape.

    If you haven't finalized your sesquicentennial plans, here are a few suggestions.

  • Hoosier citizens should be proud that three of our own congressmen are sponsors of a bill that would preserve the right to learn about malfeasance in government and elsewhere.

    The Free Flow of Information Act, a federal shield law for reporters, was written by Rep. Mike Pence, R-Ind. Sen. Richard Lugar, R-Ind., authored a companion bill in the senate and Sen. Evan Bayh, D-Ind., joined as a co-sponsor.

  • Fireworks over the Ohio River the night of Saturday, Aug. 9, will formally close Tell City's sesquicentennial celebration, but another event a week or two later might be billed not only as the final event of the 2008 celebration, but also the opening event of the community's 2058 bicentennial.

    That event, likely to take place in City Hall Park, is the sealing of a sesquicentennial time capsule packed with items from Tell City in 2008. It will be opened in 2058, the 200th anniversary of the city's founding.

  • Small signs placed in the yards of a handful of Tell City homes, and accompanying photos in The News, won't make all the eyesores in Tell City go away. But recognizing everyday efforts at keeping the city beautiful remind us that we can all lend a hand in helping our communities look their best.

  • Our nation has entered a new phase in its history: the beginning of the end of cheap, abundant energy. Southern Indiana Power director Mike Hammack's column (June 30 issue of The News) rightfully points to this profound problem we are facing, an energy crisis.

    In consideration of where we go from here, we must be willing to take a more honest look and ask deeper questions than either Hammack or his Web site recommend.

  • Had the young-lady driver been able to decipher the words coming from my lips, she might have rammed her blue Buick into my front bumper.

    The woman's sin didn't justify the bad words or the fist-pounding I gave my steering wheel. But I was still peeved and wondered why the driver - and a growing number of others like her - don't use their vehicles' turn signals.

    The lady driving the Buick was coming down the hill in Troy, leading a parade of cars and trucks through the hillside construction zone between Troy and Tell City.

  • This year has flown by and it's only a short three weeks until Tell City kicks off its 50th annual Schweizer Fest and sesquicentennial celebration.

    Here at The News, we've been working on a variety of activities to get ourselves ready for the event. We're all working on special publications and stories for the celebration as well as making and assembling items for our window display and a float for the Aug. 2 parade.

  • In February a California state appeals court ruled that unless parents have recognized teaching credentials they cannot home-school their kids.

    The court's opinion, citing a state education law, said, "Parents do not have a constitutional right to home-school their children."

    Advocates of home-schooling responded strongly against the ruling.

  • I've spent the past few weeks removing names from the birthday lists The News have maintained for many years.

    The roster of birthdays run on Thursday's Page 2B and while we've tried out best to keep it updated, it's not always been as high a priority as it should have been.

    That changed a few weeks ago when I was politely raked over the coals by a woman whose husband's name was still on the list a year after he died.

  • Pressure is mounting in Congress to do something about climate change. And while political debates in Washington, D.C., may seem far away, the outcome will have a direct impact on Southern Indiana Power, our cooperative members and other electric consumers.

    Already our nation faces a looming energy crisis, with demand for electricity ready to outstrip supply. Unless significantly more power plants are placed into service soon, consumers could experience brownouts and even rolling blackouts in the not-too-distant future.

  • An old Jesuit priest once told me during a 30-day retreat about the value of getting out of bed each morning and acknowledging the possibility that the coming day may be your last.

    "Sooner or later, you'll be right," he quipped.

    For me, the saying is a reminder of the dangers of putting things off, saying what I could do today, I'll wait and do tomorrow. Sooner or later, we run out of tomorrows.

  • To varying degrees throughout its history, this nation has viewed itself as practicing the most honorable of governmental forms. We've proudly noted that people of other lands looked to us with envy, wishing they, too, could enjoy a national fabric threaded with fairness and respect for the rule of law.

    One recent development soiled that fabric. Another reinforced it.

  • I wanted to "take my head out of the sand" (as Cannelton Mayor Smokey Graves said in a June 12 News story) long enough to explain my position as a former Cannelton city councilman regarding the city's sewer rates.

    Let me preface this by saying that it is my understanding that our community is essentially set up as a user on Tell City's sewer system.

    We pay that community monthly based upon how much sewage we send them for treatment. Our rates as individual household users can then be affected by that monthly cost, somewhat of a trickle-down effect.