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Opinion

  • I wonder what President Dwight D. Eisenhower would have thought of the essentially substanceless orgy of chauvinistic nationalism and belligerent jingoism that was the recent Republican National Convention.

    Surely he would have been appalled. It was he, after all, beloved Republican war hero, who warned us against the monstrous "military-industrial complex" that was taking shape after World War II, reminding us of our founding fathers' worry that a standing army would eventually corrupt and hobble our republic.

  • A bumpy flight into Evansville Regional Airport was about all I experienced, at least firsthand, of the windstorm that scoured southern Indiana Sept. 14. I left two days earlier to visit friends in the Plains but would have left them high and dry to experience an event that (hopefully) will never be felt here again.

  • Reading Monday's (story on Republicans and GOP vice presidential nominee Gov. Sarah Palin), it was remarkable to see people gushing about the Alaska governor.

    Knowing little about Palin, I had listened intently to her convention speech. In it were several inaccurate attacks on the Democratic candidate, Sen. Barack Obama.

    It is not surprising that Palin was so uninformed about Obama's legislative record, since she is apparently pretty uninformed about the government in general.

  • As noted on the front page of this newspaper a couple of weeks ago - and by the signs across the community - United Way of Perry County's annual fund-raising drive is under way.

    United Way hopes to raise $125,000 to support nearly 20 groups that provide a wide range of services within our community and few of us aren't touched each year by the groups who rely on United Way for a portion of their funding.

  • Public funds should never be expended without a plan and plenty of public scrutiny. Without one or the other, taxpayers feel left out and are less likely to give their support to the project at hand - and the next one coming down the pike.

  • In last week's "our view" (Sept. 1 editorial) you talked about "our responsibility for the results of our wars."

    I wasn't in town at the time but I wonder if the same lament was made when in the 1990s we bombed Bosnia or when cruise missiles hit an aspirin factory in Africa and another cruise missile hit a camp that Osama Bin Laden had left several days before.

    Did the editorial then read that we were responsible for the deaths that occurred as a result of these attacks by America, or just now because George Bush is president?

  • Fifty cents won't buy a cup of coffee any more, or even a candy bar. But a pair of quarters will still get you a copy of this newspaper, whether from the counters of the stores that sell The News or from one of the blue news boxes scattered around town.

  • It's time to take a stand, Perry County. The underage drinking cases, driving-while-intoxicated arrests and overall drug problems need to end.

    Each week, The News goes to the county courthouse and sorts through the criminal, civil and small-claims files to compile our records section. And each week the same names keep popping up, often for the same offense, and even worse, the ages keep getting younger and younger.

  • Close to 84,000 people crammed into Denver's 75,000-seat Invesco stadium last Thursday to witness history in the making as Barack Obama, America's first African-American to lead a major party ticket, accepted his nomination from the Democratic Party. People of all creeds and races, of all classes and ages, fought to leave work early, battled frustrated city traffic, survived overcrowded public transit and waited in lines for hours.

  • I gave the semi driver my worst dirty look and snapped his photo. Behind the wheel of his big rig, mired in a Friday-evening traffic jam on the hill east of Troy, the small-framed fellow may have been more worried about me and my camera than the town marshal questioning him about running a red light.

  • Did we kill 90 civilians in Afghanistan, 60 of them children, or only five?

    If it was only five, can we justify their deaths by the need to kill 25 militants, as we claimed?

    The "we" in these questions refer to we Americans. We enjoy a representative form of government, meaning decisions like waging war belong to all of us. And when we decide, or let our representatives decide on our behalf, to go to war, we share the responsibility that decision carries.

    If our representatives go beyond serving our interests, that's our responsibility, as well.

  • I made my showbiz debut way back when I was 5 years old, singing one of the best-known American songs of the Great Depression, "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?"

    I'm humming that tune in my head as I write this. But times have changed, as anybody who's bought a gallon of gas lately knows. So nowadays I'm singing, "Brother, Can You Spare a Ten?"

    Why should you give me $10? Because that money will go a lot further with me than it will in your car, believe me.

  • St. Luke's Episcopal Church in Cannelton has unveiled its new Web site, www.stlukes.indydio.org.

    This Web site has been set up by members of the congregation and hosted at no charge by the Episcopal Diocese of Indianapolis. It features a brief history of the church building, pictures of the structure and a bit about the congregation members that frequent there.

  • The two letters were the first I've written that I'm quite confident won't be read until after I'm dead. That prompted a bit of soul searching last week about how I want to be remembered by relatives and even the person who may be filling space on this page in 50 years.

    The two letters went into the sesquicentennial time capsule buried Monday evening in City Hall Park and were among hundreds of items squirreled away in concrete vaults that won't see the light of day until 2058. The ceremony was a cap of sorts of Tell City's sesquicentennial.

  • College presidents from about 100 of the nation's top universities are calling for lawmakers to consider lowering the drinking age from 21 to 18, the Associated Press reported last week. However, their arguments in support of that position seem flawed.

    "This is a law that is routinely evaded," John McCardell, former president of Middlebury College told AP writer Justin Pope. "It is a law that the people at whom it is directed believe is unjust and unfair and discriminatory."

  • The last drops of 1,269 tons of a deadly nerve agent were destroyed at the Newport Chemical Agent Disposal Facility Aug. 8. This is a signal achievement for the workers at Newport, the community and our national security.

    Plans for destroying VX gas (which contracts of all the muscles in the body, including the diaphragm, causing death by asphyxiation) at Newport began more than 20 years ago. Throughout the years, I supported the Army funds for research and development of the best and safest way to get rid of the VX.

  • Tell City's sesquicentennial is behind us. It's natural for all of us who were caught up in the celebration as planners or participants to take a collective breath and relax after all the preparation and celebrating. The spirit of the just-completed festivities should be a beginning, however, not an end, of a renewed effort to make our communities the best they can be.

  • I've seen too many men and women arrested, sentenced and carted off to prison not to know the dangers of bad decisions. I've seen them from a distance, and up close.

    I've known people, some friends, who died of drug overdoses, were torn to pieces in accidents because of drugs and alcohol or contracted AIDS due to risky behavior.

    But I've also seen people's lives redeemed, turned around and made better. The road to despair has a turn-around lane.

  • It's over. Two years of planning and hard work by numerous committees and organizations have come to an end.

    This year's 50th annual Schweizer Fest and sesquicentennial are sure to be talked about even 50 years from now for the city's 200th birthday, just as the events of 1958 are still talked about today. When the centennial celebration came to an end 50 years ago, Schweizer Fest was born and each year afterward, the city has been reminded of what makes Tell City the place it is today. This year was no exception with numerous events dedicated to its founding.

  • St. Paul's mission to New Orleans in the summer of 2007 was an eye-opening experience filled with tears, laughter and memorable moments that cannot be experienced more than once.

    For these reasons, and many more, St. Paul's 2008 mission was a completely different experience.