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Opinion

  • Now that I am interested in maintaining my youthful experimental life and living longer and growing younger, there are things I think about and wish to share with you. This summer I have come into contact with many people who are having medical appointments or hospital stays for a great variety of illnesses.

    My overall generalization about what I have heard from patient reports is the focus of this writing. Please allow me to say this. There is a serious disconnect between the patients and their medical experience.

  • I woke up one recent Saturday to find toilet paper strewn across my front yard. The dastardly act was one of the most popular of the autumn pranks and something I guess has gone on for years, maybe since there has been toilet paper.

    During the night, while I slumbered away, minor-league terrorists armed with rolls of generic roles of tissue had draped my maple trees in white streamers that hung damp and limp by the next morning.

  • President George W. Bush ought to cringe every time he hears the word "change." The mantra coming from the mouths of both men campaigning for his job proves how eager the majority of Americans are to see him leave the White House and for a failed presidency to finally end.

    No matter if you subscribe to Barack Obama's "Change we need" or John McCain's "Change is coming," all of us are looking for something new and hopefully better in our 44th president.

    If only the election had been yesterday and Inauguration Day was today.

  • After spending several minutes in a phone conversation with my sister, I decided to sit down and try to make sense of one of the most common complaints of parents, teachers and employers.

    The problems are cell phones and texting, specifically where mobile phones belong and where they don't.

    We are, unfortunately, a society that demands attention, this very minute, for everything we do. Therefore, we feel entitled to carry our phones with us everywhere, even the most inappropriate places: school, work, church and dare I have to even say it, the funeral home.

  • I was afforded the privilege last Tuesday to speak at a candlelight service in City Hall Park marking the start of National Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

    Pink bows and flags in the park and along Main Street offer a reminder of the millions of women, and their families, who are affected by breast cancer, of the importance of yearly mammograms and the need for ongoing breast-cancer research.

    Here's an edited version of my remarks, which share my mother's experience with breast cancer and the impact it had, and continues to have, on our family.

    * * *

  • Voicing our support for a $700 billion taxpayer-funded rescue of financial institutions isn't easy. Public sentiment was against the bill approved by Congress last week as many Americans see it as nothing more than a bailout of Wall Street fat cats, like the one depicted in our editorial cartoon today, who have fallen on tough times due to their own greed.

    However, we believe Americans who have the most to lose if our economy nosedives into recession will benefit from the bill.

  • We knew this would end. No, not a death, but the end of the quiet and calmness after the storm. The birds were even quiet, the squirrels leery of getting out and about.

    The deer were very jumpy. We were living without lights, running water and hot water. We could cook on an LP gas stove. Our neighbors couldn't, so we sent them boiling water for coffee. No showers, but generators running off and on in the distance.

  • I was not qualified to write a financial column until now, but recent market activity has provided me with a quick education. The biggest lesson: Investing toward retirement is exciting.

    The company managing 401K accounts for Perry County News employees offers a high-tech feature on its Web site. We can see a line chart indicating, normally, our investments' growths as we and our company feed money into them and as they enjoy, normally, market-based growth in value.

  • It's not rained in these parts for weeks, but for those smart enough to have socked away money over the past few years, the proverbial rainy day is here. Those with savings are better able to deal with a national financial crisis, including higher food and fuel costs.

    Sadly, I fear it's going to be raining economic hard times for a long time.

  • They knew better, but the Cannelton Common Council violated the law anyway.

    As we reported Thursday, the council's members met twice to discuss their proposed budget for 2009 without providing notice to the public or The News, according to Councilwoman Lynn Fulkerson.

    Indiana's Open Door Law requires governing bodies to provide the public 48 hours' advance notice of meetings, excluding weekends and holidays.

  • Often when a political candidate switches positions on an issue, critics deride that switch as a wishy-washy flip-flop, made only for political expediency. And often those critics are correct.

    But as situations evolve, there are times when responsibly thinking people - including politicians - should change their opinions on an issue.

  • I wonder what President Dwight D. Eisenhower would have thought of the essentially substanceless orgy of chauvinistic nationalism and belligerent jingoism that was the recent Republican National Convention.

    Surely he would have been appalled. It was he, after all, beloved Republican war hero, who warned us against the monstrous "military-industrial complex" that was taking shape after World War II, reminding us of our founding fathers' worry that a standing army would eventually corrupt and hobble our republic.

  • A bumpy flight into Evansville Regional Airport was about all I experienced, at least firsthand, of the windstorm that scoured southern Indiana Sept. 14. I left two days earlier to visit friends in the Plains but would have left them high and dry to experience an event that (hopefully) will never be felt here again.

  • Reading Monday's (story on Republicans and GOP vice presidential nominee Gov. Sarah Palin), it was remarkable to see people gushing about the Alaska governor.

    Knowing little about Palin, I had listened intently to her convention speech. In it were several inaccurate attacks on the Democratic candidate, Sen. Barack Obama.

    It is not surprising that Palin was so uninformed about Obama's legislative record, since she is apparently pretty uninformed about the government in general.

  • As noted on the front page of this newspaper a couple of weeks ago - and by the signs across the community - United Way of Perry County's annual fund-raising drive is under way.

    United Way hopes to raise $125,000 to support nearly 20 groups that provide a wide range of services within our community and few of us aren't touched each year by the groups who rely on United Way for a portion of their funding.

  • Public funds should never be expended without a plan and plenty of public scrutiny. Without one or the other, taxpayers feel left out and are less likely to give their support to the project at hand - and the next one coming down the pike.

  • In last week's "our view" (Sept. 1 editorial) you talked about "our responsibility for the results of our wars."

    I wasn't in town at the time but I wonder if the same lament was made when in the 1990s we bombed Bosnia or when cruise missiles hit an aspirin factory in Africa and another cruise missile hit a camp that Osama Bin Laden had left several days before.

    Did the editorial then read that we were responsible for the deaths that occurred as a result of these attacks by America, or just now because George Bush is president?

  • Fifty cents won't buy a cup of coffee any more, or even a candy bar. But a pair of quarters will still get you a copy of this newspaper, whether from the counters of the stores that sell The News or from one of the blue news boxes scattered around town.

  • It's time to take a stand, Perry County. The underage drinking cases, driving-while-intoxicated arrests and overall drug problems need to end.

    Each week, The News goes to the county courthouse and sorts through the criminal, civil and small-claims files to compile our records section. And each week the same names keep popping up, often for the same offense, and even worse, the ages keep getting younger and younger.

  • Close to 84,000 people crammed into Denver's 75,000-seat Invesco stadium last Thursday to witness history in the making as Barack Obama, America's first African-American to lead a major party ticket, accepted his nomination from the Democratic Party. People of all creeds and races, of all classes and ages, fought to leave work early, battled frustrated city traffic, survived overcrowded public transit and waited in lines for hours.