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Opinion

  • Memo to teachers and other authority figures nationwide: Respond to actual threats where they exist. Where no threat exists, leave our children alone.

    A teacher in West Virginia demanded that a high-school student remove a T-shirt decorated with the National Rifle Association logo and a picture of a rifle, according to media reports last week. Also adorning the shirt were the words, “Protect your right.”

  • Most think the U.S. Supreme Court will issue a ruling this spring on whether gay marriages are legal, but that may not occur. Instead the court may simply let each state decide that issue.

    Two related cases questioning the constitutionality of gay-marriage bans are currently before the Supreme Court. One involves California’s Proposition 8, in which that state’s voters banned gay marriages in November 2008.

  • If a new hotel along Tell City’s Seventh Street is feasible economically, let’s not waste time. Let’s make it happen.

    That was the message Tony Pappano delivered to the Perry County Convention and Visitors Bureau a few weeks ago. Pappano is a grant administrator and community visionary who for years has helped our area leverage grant funds. He was instrumental in Tell City being awarded and successfully administering more than $2 million in Neighborhood Stabilization Fund grants over the past few years.

  • Stop littering!

    It’s a message often repeated but one that has apparently yet to sink in the minds of the litterbugs of Perry County whose ugly handiwork can be seen alongside highways and county roads.

  • A Lee Greenwood song, “Proud to be an American,” inspired a swell of patriotism 10 years ago. Because its 10th anniversary is being observed this month, some media outlets are looking back on this nation’s war in Iraq.

    They don’t inspire much pride.

    Retrospectives are useful for lessons-learned purposes. We’d like to highlight several lessons we hope the nation has learned.

  • Budgets are important, especially now during a time when the American economy is slowly attempting to pick itself up. Families, business owners and individuals know how important it is to spend their money wisely. We would hope our elected government officials would share the same mentality, as it is a basic principle in handling money.

  • Everything isn’t always what it seems to be in politics, and sometimes just the threat to do something can produce the desired result.

    History buffs are familiar with the Judicial Procedures Reform Bill of 1937, frequently called the court-packing plan. Because the U.S. Supreme Court had ruled several parts of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal legislation unconstitutional, Roosevelt suggested this bill to add more members to the Supreme Court. The Constitution does not specify how many members the court must have.

  • Tell City Councilman Chris Cail’s decision last month to raise the issue of annexation was well-timed. A front-page News story appeared that day listing some of the recommendations of a just-completed comprehensive plan for the community.

    The lead recommendation was for the city to move forward in preparing a plan to incorporate nearby areas.

  • We have often wondered how teachers keep up with all of the changes thrown at them.

    Most of the changes come from Indianapolis, and with Tony Bennett serving as the state’s chief education official, their rollout has been fast and furious.

  • As noted in a story printed in the Nov. 15 issue of the Perry County News, the Perry County commissioners voted and accepted a new logo to represent all of the county.

    The picture – that of a sun rising over a hilly landscape with the words “Perry County Indiana” and “life is better” – is a part of a joint effort by three county entities to market the county as a whole.

  • Probably television stations, which received giant amounts of political advertising revenue this year, are the only ones not glad that the U.S. elections are over. But since many of the races were close at the national and state levels, it will be interesting to see how the victors govern.

    President Barack Obama once again proved to be a highly skillful campaigner. Virtually his only misstep was being too passive in his first debate with Republican challenger Mitt Romney.

  • A successful American government flows from an informed electorate. We are nearing the end of another historic campaign season. Historic not for any one single event, but historic because every vote we cast connects us to our past.

    Each time we step into the poll, we should be reminded of the fact that in our past every American did not have the right to vote. It is for that reason that every Hoosier should be disappointed when only 22 percent of Indiana’s 4.4 million registered voters cast a ballot during the primary election.

  • There are a lot of stories coming out from the presidential debates between incumbent President Barack Obama and Republican nominee Mitt Romney.

  • If something helps our area’s economy even a little, as well as providing additional opportunities for family entertainment close to home, that is worth celebrating. So we salute Holiday World for adding two additional weekends to its schedule this year with its Happy Halloween weekends.

    The park was previously open the first two weekends of October but converted all four October weekends this year to Halloween-themed activities, including offering hay rides, face painting, glitter tattoos and trick or treating.

  • “It’s unfortunate that a handshake doesn’t mean what it used to,” lamented a teachers’ representative at the last Cannelton School Board meeting.

    A signature has little value in the corporation, as well.

    Janet Abrams, with the Indiana State Teachers Association, had just said at the board’s Sept. 20 meeting the teachers had agreed to some requests from Schools Superintendent Al Sibbitt, and shook hands before parting ways.

  • The newspaper business – both small and large papers – has sounded full-throated opposition this past month about a plan by the U.S. Postal Service to purposely entice advertising out of the newspaper so ads can be placed instead with USPS-favored stakeholder Valassis Inc., which bought direct-mail company ADVO in 2006.

  • During a presidential-election year, the Indiana State Bar Association, Indiana Secretary of State and the Indiana Department of Education sponsor a program called Indiana Kids’ Election. This mock election allows Hoosier students in kindergarten through 12th grades to go through the voting process Nov. 6, just as their parents, grandparents and other adults will do.

  • Some descendants of Dr. Samuel Mudd are still trying to clear his name for being convicted of being part of the conspiracy to assassinate Abraham Lincoln. Mudd set John Wilkes Booth’s broken leg, suffered when he jumped from the presidential box at Ford’s Theatre.

    Some are also not sure that Mary Surratt, who was convicted and hanged for being part of the conspiracy, was guilty. Robert Redford directed a movie about her case last year.

  • The recent death of Neil Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon, brings up the question of what would be the best way to honor his memory.

    One way we have immortalized some great men is declaring their birthday a national holiday. We have also declared the Monday closest to Oct. 12, the day Christopher Columbus first landed in the New World, a national holiday even though we now know some Viking explorers arrived in the Americas before he did.

  • When properly communicated and carried out, the words, “We’re watching you” can be powerful.

    They apparently haven’t been uttered by the board of trustees for the Cannelton City Schools.

    Who was minding the cash drawer for the school corporation as hundreds of thousands of dollars were being diverted? And why were most of the diversions not detected or acted upon until a state audit was conducted?