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Opinion

  • A successful American government flows from an informed electorate. We are nearing the end of another historic campaign season. Historic not for any one single event, but historic because every vote we cast connects us to our past.

    Each time we step into the poll, we should be reminded of the fact that in our past every American did not have the right to vote. It is for that reason that every Hoosier should be disappointed when only 22 percent of Indiana’s 4.4 million registered voters cast a ballot during the primary election.

  • There are a lot of stories coming out from the presidential debates between incumbent President Barack Obama and Republican nominee Mitt Romney.

  • If something helps our area’s economy even a little, as well as providing additional opportunities for family entertainment close to home, that is worth celebrating. So we salute Holiday World for adding two additional weekends to its schedule this year with its Happy Halloween weekends.

    The park was previously open the first two weekends of October but converted all four October weekends this year to Halloween-themed activities, including offering hay rides, face painting, glitter tattoos and trick or treating.

  • “It’s unfortunate that a handshake doesn’t mean what it used to,” lamented a teachers’ representative at the last Cannelton School Board meeting.

    A signature has little value in the corporation, as well.

    Janet Abrams, with the Indiana State Teachers Association, had just said at the board’s Sept. 20 meeting the teachers had agreed to some requests from Schools Superintendent Al Sibbitt, and shook hands before parting ways.

  • The newspaper business – both small and large papers – has sounded full-throated opposition this past month about a plan by the U.S. Postal Service to purposely entice advertising out of the newspaper so ads can be placed instead with USPS-favored stakeholder Valassis Inc., which bought direct-mail company ADVO in 2006.

  • During a presidential-election year, the Indiana State Bar Association, Indiana Secretary of State and the Indiana Department of Education sponsor a program called Indiana Kids’ Election. This mock election allows Hoosier students in kindergarten through 12th grades to go through the voting process Nov. 6, just as their parents, grandparents and other adults will do.

  • Some descendants of Dr. Samuel Mudd are still trying to clear his name for being convicted of being part of the conspiracy to assassinate Abraham Lincoln. Mudd set John Wilkes Booth’s broken leg, suffered when he jumped from the presidential box at Ford’s Theatre.

    Some are also not sure that Mary Surratt, who was convicted and hanged for being part of the conspiracy, was guilty. Robert Redford directed a movie about her case last year.

  • The recent death of Neil Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon, brings up the question of what would be the best way to honor his memory.

    One way we have immortalized some great men is declaring their birthday a national holiday. We have also declared the Monday closest to Oct. 12, the day Christopher Columbus first landed in the New World, a national holiday even though we now know some Viking explorers arrived in the Americas before he did.

  • When properly communicated and carried out, the words, “We’re watching you” can be powerful.

    They apparently haven’t been uttered by the board of trustees for the Cannelton City Schools.

    Who was minding the cash drawer for the school corporation as hundreds of thousands of dollars were being diverted? And why were most of the diversions not detected or acted upon until a state audit was conducted?

  • Don’t worry your pretty little heads about it, Hoosiers.

    The state of Indiana is perfectly comfortable keeping you in the dark. It makes things easier for special interests and the government employees who are supposed to be regulating them.

    The latest evidence supporting that assertion comes from the Indiana Department of Environmental Management’s Office of Air Quality.

  • Back-to-school time has arrived and across Perry County, yellow school buses are or will soon be venturing onto highways and county roads. Their precious cargo is our inspiration for writing. Drivers should be extra careful to watch for youngsters. There will also be an increase in pedestrian traffic, particularly around schools.

  • Cannelton’s common council voted at a recent meeting to close the city’s historic gazebo to public use. We understand their reasons for doing it and know they didn’t make the decision lightly.

    It was called a temporary measure, but we don’t foresee the reasons for it going away in the near future. Not without concerted action, anyway.

    The reasons are a handful of people who have vandalized the gazebo.

  • A few words about gay marriage made by Chick-fil-A President Dan Cathy have certainly led to the spilling of ink in recent days. That didn’t surprise us. Neither did reactions that included Wednesday’s support of a Chick-fil-A event sponsored by Mick Huckabee or Friday’s “kiss-in” planned by those who disagree with Cathy’s comments.

    Regular customers of the restaurant chain probably hope things get back to normal soon. Good luck.

  • Trista Lutgring, Feature Writer

    I’m sure you’ve heard of a bucket list; many of you probably have one. These lists generally include things one wishes to accomplish in their life before they pass on. As someone who has seen writing as a hobby since a very young age, one of the goals I have always set very high on my bucket list has been to write a book.

    I am happy to let you know I can mark that goal off my bucket list. At the age of 26, I think that’s a great feat to accomplish.

  • Vince Luecke, Editor

    There’s not much I don’t like about Schweizer Fest, even the extra work it piles onto my desk and those of my News co-workers. We’ve just wrapped up work on the 54th annual celebration’s program guide and are pulling together stories for our Schweizer Zeitung, the yearly special section profiling Tell City’s history.

  • BY DAVID HAMMOND, Guest Columnist
    A lot has been said about right-to-work and a lot more will be said in the upcoming legislative session. Voters need to understand the meaning of the term and consequences of its implementation.

    Right-to-work laws are statutes enforced in 22 U.S. states that prohibit membership, payment of union dues, or fees as condition of employment, either before or after hiring.

  • BY VINCE LUECKE, Editor
    So long, 2011. Almost, at least. It’s been an up-and-down year at best for this columnist and part of me is more than eager to turn the calendar and celebrate 2012.

  • In his autobiography, Mark Twain said, “There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies and statistics.” There was a lot of truth in that humorous remark, which helps explain why the facts aren’t always what they appear to be.

    One example is the often-stated “fact” that the U.S. Postal Service is losing money and needs to reduce mail delivery from six to five days a week and eventually to three days a week.

  • State Auditor Tim Berry recently revealed the state’s spending limit was better than everyone in Indianapolis thought it would be. According to figures released by Berry Thursday, the state finished out the budget year – which ended June 30 – with a surplus of approximately $1.2 billion.

    He went on to point out the surplus can be credited to the mixture of improved income-tax collections and more than $1 billion in budget cuts.

    So, news of a surplus could mean some funding will go back into the state, right?

  • The Obama Administration’s arguments against getting Congress’ approval to continue military actions in Libya have the stink of dishonesty.

    Honor and honesty share a common root. If we are not honest, we have no honor. No honesty exists in our nation showering Libya with bombs, then claiming it’s not war and therefore Congress needn’t be bothered to consider whether the killing and destruction should continue.