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Opinion

  • I am not a runner. I do not like to run. I'm even weary about walking sometimes because I'm a klutz and am known to randomly fall at the drop of a hat. (Believe me this is not an exaggeration, I have witnesses.) Yet, I am going to participate in a 5K run and walk.

    And I don't mean "participate" by handing out flyers, putting it in the paper for others to see or setting up a booth. I mean I'm going to train at least three days a week to get ready for the Teens Aware of Christ Runnin' With the Lord 5K run and walk.

  • "Knowing," the latest film from Alex Proyas ("The Crow," "I, Robot") almost delves into M. Night Shyamalan territory — it does feature a main character much like Mel Gibson's character from "Signs" — but it saves itself with an entertaining science-fiction plot and some of the best disaster sequences I have ever seen.  

  • The sour economy, layoffs, foreclosures and an overall financial pinch felt by everyone, haven't created much to cheer about in recent months. And while the recession may not be news to anyone's ears, there's still plenty of good taking place in our community. For this week's editorial, we're looking at some of the many, and sometimes overlooked, positives.  

  • Two days of bullying-prevention training dredged up plenty of old school memories earlier this month, most of which I wanted to keep buried.

    Yes, Mom, it's true. I was a bad bully in elementary school and in one of life's lessons in justice, was in turn bullied at times in junior-high school.

    For those who haven't noticed the stories in The News, Tell City-Troy Township School Corp., is taking part in the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program, a well respected effort that strives to help schools and communities reduce bullying of children.

  • Girl Scouts of Raintree Council recently joined nearly 4 million adult and girl members throughout the nation in celebrating Girl Scout Week.

    This year's national observance marked the 97th anniversary of the founding of Girl Scouting by Juliette Gordon Low March 12, 1912.

    Over the years, Girl Scout programs have made a lasting impact on girls' lives by providing activities that help build the courage, confidence and character girls need to grow into confident adults who make the world a better place.

  • A proposal to provide low-cost public transportation in Perry County looks like a good idea, but should be approached with caution.

    Speaking for the director of Ride Solution, an agency providing rides in eight counties, Pat Glenn told county commissioners March 2 the county's transportation advisory committee wants to include Marksman Cab owner Jerry Sprinkle in a partnership they say would benefit everyone.

  • I'm not much into green beer and while I'm a fan of corned beef, I can do without cabbage.

    Tomorrow is St. Patrick's Day and while lots of us will be wearing the green, a lack of Irish heritage doesn't inspire me to truly celebrate the day like those whose family trees have roots in the Emerald Isle. I enjoy reading about Irish history and the nation is near the top of places I still want to explore.

  • Each year the members of Leadership Perry County are charged with designing and delivering a project to improve the lives of the citizens of Perry County. Seventeen years ago a small group of emerging leaders from the first graduating class took on the task of creating the Perry County Community Foundation.

  • The sky is falling! The sky is falling! Or so many media reports about our nation's current economic condition seem to indicate.

    One of the latest stories to scare people was an Associated Press report last Monday by Tom Raum and Daniel Wagner, who said we may now be in a depression, not just a recession.

    Stocks tumbled most of the week - reaching 12-year lows Thursday - probably partially due to Raum and Wagner's report, as investors were selling and taking their losses, fearful that a depression like that of the 1930s was about to grip the United States.

  • Life teaches us hard, but valuable lessons. One of the most valuable comes as a warning: don't take what we value for granted, especially people. Of all the commodities people put value in, the scarcest, and perhaps most valuable, is time.

    There's no futures market on extra days, months and years. We're only allotted so much of it and when our meter expires, so to speak, we're gone.

  • What is 4-H? I get that question a lot. I have two different answers. 4-H is a community of young people who are learning leadership, citizenship and life skills. But I can also give another answer - 4-H is fun.

    4-H is a chance to help others in your community - whether it is collecting money to purchase items for those less fortunate, going to a nursing home to play bingo just to keep the residents company for one evening or sending cards to troops or veterans. These are all community-service projects Perry County 4-H'ers have accomplished.

  • "Watchmen" comes out tomorrow, but many of you out there may not have a clue what it's about. Sure, there are costumed crime fighters and what appears to be plenty of action, but is this just another comic book movie? No, actually you might say it's the anti-comic book movie.

  • Perry County stands to gain hundreds of thousands - perhaps  even millions - of dollars in federal stimulus spending. That's good news. We welcome needed local investments in roads, streets, sewers and other infrastructure projects that will help our community prosper in the future.

  • My cupboards are packed with peanut butter and jelly, mushroom soup and a few tins of sardines. My freezer holds  boxes of fish sticks and a sack of shrimp for some special pre-Easter occasion.

    Lent is here and that means, at least for me this year, abstaining from meat and amending unhealthy behaviors.

    In a quest to bolster my usual ho-hum approach to Lent, I'm trying to avoid meat through Easter. Yep, 40 days without steak, hamburger and pork chops. Call it an effort at self-denial and penance for years of eating poorly.

  • A cause Tell City Councilman Tony Hollinden and others are pushing throughout the county is more relevant to many of us than we may realize.

    During each election season, the major media inform all of us Americans whether we live in red or blue states, depending on whether we're dominated by Republicans or Democrats. For the rest of the year, other colors matter more.

  • Throughout the current legislative session, our state's elected officials are working to pass bills on varying issues, including state funding of schools, property taxes and economic development.

    Though it covers a topic not many Hoosiers think about on a daily basis, we feel Senate Bill 232 is one of the important bills introduced in the Statehouse. It enforces public officials' adherence to the state's Open Door laws.

    According to information provided tous by the Hoosier State Press Association, which is recommending the bill's passage, the legislation would:

  • I don't like to think of myself as superstitious. I scoff at Friday the 13ths, including the one that passed this month without incident. I don't worry about black cats - there's one on Main Street that darts out in front of me at least once a week - and I don't worry about walking under ladders, breaking mirrors or stepping on a crack that might break my saintly mother's back.

    No, my venial superstitions center around birds.   

  • Tri Kappa members across the state of Indiana are celebrating Tri Kappa Week, Feb. 22-29. The Tell City Epsilon Omega Chapter of Kappa Kappa Kappa Inc. would like to thank the community for its kind support of the chapter's projects this past year.

    Our biggest fundraising projects were Kaffee Klatch held during Tell City's sesquicentennial and 50th Schweizer Fest, its poinsettia sale in December and the community art-prints project. Sketches of well known landmarks throughout Perry County, part of an ongoing project, are still available for sale.

  • Parents, have you ever dropped your kids off at a public place where you think they are safe, like a local ball field or a location where many kids gather to hang out?                                        

  • We'd like to offer a tip of our hat to the Perry County commissioners for backing off from a $100,000 purchase two of them voted in early January to make.

    Commissioners Gary Dauby and Jody Fortwendel pressed for a Street and Road Management System offered by David Goffinet, now working for the Bernardin, Lochmueller and Associates engineering firm of Evansville.