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Opinion

  • It's hard to focus on positives with so many negative events going on in our world. Many people are frightened about our future, but I would like to extend a special invitation to all Perry County residents to come to the 4-H fair (July 12-19) to grasp a glimpse into an optimistic future.

    Perry County 4-H has many kids who are changing the world in a positive way and the 4-H fair is a time for the public to see what 4-H'ers are doing. It is an exciting time for youth to show off what they've learned in the past year, but they work on their 4-H projects year round.

  • Perry County is half a world away from the nation and people of Iran, in distance and in culture, but we suspect a good number of our readers have seen or heard about the bravery of the many Iranians who are voicing the need for change in their land. These new revolutionaries offer a glimmer of hope for their nation and the world community.

  • If the Pied Piper came calling today, would you follow? For me, I suppose, it would depend on the tune.

    Last Friday marked the traditional date the legendary Pied Piper of Hamelin strolled out of the German town with its kinder in tow.  It's only been a few weeks since I talked with a vacationing friend who had just visited Lower Saxony, where Hamelin is found and I've had the legendary piper on my mind.

  • In the June 11th issue of The News, Democrat (State Rep.) Russ Stilwell wrote a misleading piece titled Governor's budget would hurt Hoosiers. Here is what he didn't tell you.

    Gov. Mitch Daniels made an honest attempt to meet House Democrats in the middle but they wouldn't have it. The Democratic proposal violates all of the governor's parameters and will go down in history as the least taxpayer-friendly budget of all time. If this budget is adopted it is a surefire path to the bankruptcies and tax increases that many other states are experiencing.

  • Television. That magical "moving picture" box has provided entertainment and news to households for decades. It has also gone through changes over the years. Older viewers started out small, with only black-and-white screens. People can now purchase large flat-screen, high-definition color televisions, which give living rooms a movie-theater quality.

  • The first part of June marked my third anniversary at The Perry County News and my move to Perry County. I was fresh out of Murray State University when I moved here in late May 2006 and while I worked at my college newspaper, I was eager to start my first "real" journalism job.

    After three years, I'm sure there are still plenty of Perry Countians who don't know who I am, but I hope that'll get fixed in the next few years, maybe by the time I retire. Anyway, on to the point of this whole column.

  • Every day our government gives us a reason to grumble, whether it's been imposing new taxes or something else. But last week the hard work of Tell City officials and Insight 2000 gave us a reason to cheer.

    As The News reported Thursday, Tell City received more than $1.8 million in a Neighborhood Stabilization Grant. This money will be used to purchase abandoned and foreclosed homes, demolish dilapidated structures and redevelop vacant lots.

  • Our company has long given employees the day off for their birthdays. This year I was given that and a second gift: the care of of a second newspaper.

    Since June 1, our editorial staff here at The Perry County News has been working with and overseeing the staff of The Journal-Democrat in Rockport. How has it been going? The past two weeks have been a challenge. There have been more meetings to cover, added telephone calls and dozens of extra e-mails to sort through each day. I feel more stretched than usual.

  • "The Hangover," despite a slow start, is a downright hilarious comedy that is a welcome change from all the big summer movie fare.

    This movie doesn't pretend to be anything it's not. It is an R-rated comedy about a bachelor party gone wrong in Las Vegas. You can imagine the glorification of debauchery that ensues.

  • Like a beam of sunlight breaking through dark storm clouds, a glimmer of hope appeared Thursday in a National Public Radio report.

    NPR's Martin Kaste said the state-secrets tactic has failed to stop a lawsuit contending the U.S. government violated the privacy rights of an Islamic charity when it monitored the group's telephone conversations without obtaining a warrant first.

  • A long time ago, when summers came without a job, mortgage or other real-world responsibilities, the months of June and July seemed to be heaven-sent. There were, admittedly, farm chores to shoulder, hay to haul and a lawn to mow, but those were trifling interruptions in what seemed to be an endless string of carefree days.

    It's been during weeks like these that I miss those summers and long to roll back the years.

  • President Barack Obama's recently announced plan to require automobiles to average 35.5 miles per gallon of gasoline by 2016 has evoked criticism from a variety of sources.

    We agree that the plan is not perfect, but we think much of the criticism is misguided.

    Obama's proposal would require cars to average 39 mpg and light trucks to average 30 mpg under a system that develops standards for each vehicle class. It would also require automobiles to reduce carbon-dioxide emissions by about one-third.

  • Today's column is a potluck of sorts, bits of news and small items sent to me by readers over the past week that I've been moving from one stack of papers on my desk to the other.

    Mars Disappointments

    I received an e-mail Wednesday from Pam Hilgenhold, mother of Perry Central student Levi Hilgenhold. I wrote a story in March about Levi's selection by NASA as one of nine finalists to name a new Mars rover.

  • Editor's Note: Logan Harding took first-place honors with this essay, submitted in the annual Friends of Southern Hills Writing Contest. Students were asked to place themselves in the role of an elected official and to respond to a constituent who needed their help with a personal or family problem.

    The Humvee cruised through the small town on the Iraq border. As the 142nd Airbome Division drove through the town, a man ran out in the road in front of them.

  • The release of a damning report detailing decades of abuse of young people in Ireland's church-operated reform schools didn't make the headlines it should have last week, at least not in the United States.

    Call it old news.

  • All newspapers worry about hanging on to their readers. Publishers, editors and circulation managers fret about studies that show today's young readers don't take as much interest in newspapers as their parents and grandparents.

    That's not good news and may be a result of increased competition from online news as well as newspapers not providing content geared to young readers. What it means is that newspapers need to do more to get young people connected with their hometown newspapers.

  • The economic travails that we are experiencing began with the collapse of the housing market. Sub-prime, low-interest loans to people who lacked sufficient income to make their monthly payments began this tumble into oblivion.

    Follow along. The origin of the sub-prime market collapse goes back to 1977, when Carter signed into law the Community Reinvestment Act. It was passed by a Congress even more profoundly liberal than today's.

  • Memorial Day is approaching and we hope Perry Countians will commit a portion of the long weekend to recalling the heroism of the men and women who gave their lives in service to our land.

    Unfortunately, Memorial Day risks being crowded out by so many other activities: graduations, vacations, even auto racing. We know the first summer holiday is a busy time for everyone, but we encourage individuals and families to honor fallen and living veterans.

  • Congratulations high-school graduates: The big day you've been waiting for so long has arrived.

    In just a few days, you'll take those anticipated steps onto a stage and claim that diploma. You'll also take a giant step toward adulthood.

    Amid the congratulations and cards, weekend barbecues and cookouts, take time over the next few days to thank the people who have made the big day possible.

  • The previews for the new "Star Trek" film claim that this "is not your father's 'Star Trek' " and I have to agree, slightly. But that doesn't mean that old fans should avoid this immensely entertaining film. It is technically a reboot of the series, but there are enough little jokes and throwbacks to appease the older fans while embracing the new. Maybe hardcore fans will denounce it, but people like me (who have only a slight interest in the series) will love the comedy and constant action.