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Opinion

  • For me, Schweizer Fest is a lot like some holidays. There is lots of extra work, so much in fact that finding time to enjoy the actual festivities can be a challenge.  

    The weeks before Schweizer Fest have our staff working on our Zeitung, the special section appearing in today's issue, as well as extra stories about festival events. For the past two years, we've also assembled the official programs that contain the week's schedule as well as other information about Tell City.  

  • It is regretful how long it took me to find time for history. When I was a child, history was conveniently personified in the image of my great uncle Otis during visits to my grandparents' house.

    Otis was a war hero, and on his rare Sunday visits, he was treated like a dignitary. The admiration and awe exhibited by my relatives in his midst were lost on me, though, despite attempts to coax me to listen to this decorated veteran talk about the death march, work camps, prison ships, starvation and torture he endured for three hellish years as a prisoner of war in the Philippines.

  • Canning or freezing home-grown vegetables is a great way to preserve summer's bounty for year-round enjoyment. For beginners, most experts recommend freezing over canning.

    As long as you have plenty of freezer space, this option requires very little initial investment and is a simple and convenient way to preserve fruits and vegetables. Freezing also helps retain the fresh flavor better than canning.

  • We urge the residents of the Tell City-Troy Township school district to get behind the second launch of efforts to make major improvements at the city's high school.

  • A 2004 stopover at a German family's farm inspired an idea that now has my neighbors talking.

    Three years ago, while doing my best to stay on Bavaria's small roads instead of the high-speed superhighways, I pulled my rental car into a gift shop near Lichtenfels in upper Bavaria.

    A large half-timbered home there had been transformed into a small lodge and gift shop while the rest of the farm's buildings, including a dairy, small brewery and livestock barns had kept much of their traditional look and use.

  • As we approach the 2009 Schweizer Fest, many of us start planning to meet up with friends, host members of our family or welcome others from out of town who come back to celebrate our town's heritage. 

    We plan to attend the fair, see the talent show, and for those of age, visit the brau garten.

  • Visitors to the last week's Perry County 4-H fair had the chance to see and take part in a variety of activities. Busy 4-H'ers proudly displayed their projects and livestock exhibits. 4-H'ers and visitors took part in games, wrestled hogs, listened to music, saw motocross and demolition derbies and saw young people compete in contests and pageants.

  • With the U.S. economy still officially in a recession, many people are looking for entertainment bargains.

    Some may not think a night out that costs $40 per person is a great deal, but if it is a professionally done play with an Emmy-award winning actor and also includes a delicious meal — all at a location less than 25 miles from Tell City — that sounds pretty good.

  • This in response to the piece written by Jim Adkins (July 13 guest column "Baron Hill and Cap and Trade.") It's time for an honest discussion on the American Clean Energy and Security Act rather than a partisan rant.  I'd like to point out a few facts about the bill.  

    First off, the energy bill is about protecting our national security and creating jobs.  I, for one, am tired of exporting billions of dollars each year to the Middle East where al Qaeda terrorists use it against us.

  • Perry County Humane Society President Jim Carter has worked tirelessly to help animals big and small. Whether it's promoting spaying and neutering cats and dogs or working hard to promote the many animals available at the Perry County Animal Shelter, he's helped Perry County's furry friends numerous times.

  • Summer is nowhere near its end, but it's speeding by. Don't let the season pass without exploring the varied tastes this time of the year brings, whether in local gardens, farmers markets or roadside stands. For me, mid and late summer are the best times to enjoy the bounty of nature.

    Many of us tend to gardens of various sizes and I've already overheard green thumbs bragging about their first batches of green beans, ripening tomatoes and the size of new potatoes unearthed.

  • District Democrat Rep. Brad Ellsworth stated recently that a proposed cap-and-trade bill would be especially tough on Indiana. "The bill would place undue burdens on Indiana families and businesses, and particularly in these tough economic times, I could not support it," Ellsworth said.

    President Obama, himself, said that the bill would bankrupt the coal industry.

  • "Public Enemies," the latest from director Michael Mann ("Heat," "Collateral"), is a strangely quiet mess of a movie.  I expected the story of popular outlaw John Dillinger (played by Johnny Depp in a toned down but enjoyable performance) to be more cinematic and interesting.

  • Indiana just avoided a state government shutdown after longer than usual budget negotiations prompted by the state's now taking in less tax revenue than in recent years.

    And our federal government is running up record budget deficits to try to get the economy going again.

    But one idea recently suggested by Internal Revenue Service Commissioner Doug Shulman could help federal and state governments collect more tax revenues regardless of the state of the economy.

  • I'm not going to weigh in on today's front-page story on the apparent proposal to combine the duties of administrative assistants to county commissioners and the office of planning and zoning.

    Commissioners will take up that issue this evening, but one of the topics raised during Wednesday evening's meeting of the plan commission is worth my two cents: that of how positions with the county are advertised and filled.

  • It's hard to focus on positives with so many negative events going on in our world. Many people are frightened about our future, but I would like to extend a special invitation to all Perry County residents to come to the 4-H fair (July 12-19) to grasp a glimpse into an optimistic future.

    Perry County 4-H has many kids who are changing the world in a positive way and the 4-H fair is a time for the public to see what 4-H'ers are doing. It is an exciting time for youth to show off what they've learned in the past year, but they work on their 4-H projects year round.

  • Perry County is half a world away from the nation and people of Iran, in distance and in culture, but we suspect a good number of our readers have seen or heard about the bravery of the many Iranians who are voicing the need for change in their land. These new revolutionaries offer a glimmer of hope for their nation and the world community.

  • If the Pied Piper came calling today, would you follow? For me, I suppose, it would depend on the tune.

    Last Friday marked the traditional date the legendary Pied Piper of Hamelin strolled out of the German town with its kinder in tow.  It's only been a few weeks since I talked with a vacationing friend who had just visited Lower Saxony, where Hamelin is found and I've had the legendary piper on my mind.

  • In the June 11th issue of The News, Democrat (State Rep.) Russ Stilwell wrote a misleading piece titled Governor's budget would hurt Hoosiers. Here is what he didn't tell you.

    Gov. Mitch Daniels made an honest attempt to meet House Democrats in the middle but they wouldn't have it. The Democratic proposal violates all of the governor's parameters and will go down in history as the least taxpayer-friendly budget of all time. If this budget is adopted it is a surefire path to the bankruptcies and tax increases that many other states are experiencing.

  • Television. That magical "moving picture" box has provided entertainment and news to households for decades. It has also gone through changes over the years. Older viewers started out small, with only black-and-white screens. People can now purchase large flat-screen, high-definition color televisions, which give living rooms a movie-theater quality.