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Opinion

  • "District 9," the part faux documentary, part straight up sci-fi film, is one of the most enjoyable, compelling, thought-provoking films of the year. This is what great science fiction films are all about. There are amazing visuals, the action is brutal and impressive, and there are mirrors held up to humanity.

  • "We're eager to get going," Gov. Mitch Daniels said in a news release Thursday, referring to the imminent arrival of federal stimulus money that will help people improve their homes' energy efficiency.

    "Our goal is to lower utility costs for as many people as possible as quickly as possible, putting a dent in Indiana's overall energy consumption along the way."

  • My name is Danny R. Bolin. I am an inmate at Branchville Correctional Facility and I am writing this letter on behalf of myself, Paul James and Shawn Kahler, who are housed in a therapeutic community program dorm for treatment of alcoholics, drug addictions and criminal behaviors.

    It has been a great blessing to all three of us and others to have had the opportunity to participate in a treatment program such as this one.

  • "Inglourious Basterds," the latest from Quentin Tarantino, is exactly what you would expect from the director of "Kill Bill" and "Pulp Fiction." The stylish World War II Nazi-hunting movie is tense, violent, slow-burning, hilarious, and jaw-dropping.

    While this might be what a Tarantino fan would always expect, it's not necessarily the film that the previews promised. I've noticed more and more lately that ads for movies either give everything away, or are cut in such a way that they seem to be showcasing completely different films.

  • Tell City, like most small-town communities, takes pride in its high-school sports teams and marching band.

  • I didn't give much serious thought this summer to trading in my old car for a new one, but I did nose around the government's Cash for Clunkers Program that made so much news this summer.

  • After Sept.11, 2001, the United States found itself involved in a new kind of warfare. We had an enemy with no discernable borders, no real army or uniforms. He was elusive and was hiding in at least 40 different countries all around the world.

    There was no way we could fight his kind of shadowy war. The only way to get at him was to coerce him to fight ours.

  • Editor's Note: Due to its size, this column by Randy Paris about a planned recovery home on Girl Scout Road is being published in two parts. The first ran Monday. Here, Paris talks about efforts rezone land for the home and rules residents will have to abide by.

    The Recovery Connection board met with a zoning committee, which referred it to the commissioners for a decision. During the hearing with the zoning board, there were many questions and doubts raised.

  • Another Schweizer Fest has come and gone. A week after its conclusion  we're left with not only warm memories of a successful community event but hope and optimism about the festival's future - and its growth.

    Schweizer Fest is already the longest-running community festival in southern Indiana. That success has been achieved by providing experiences all of us look forward to, whether they be rides and games around City Hall Park, a lively beer garden, great live entertainment and crowd-pleasing attractions such as road runs, pet show and diaper derby.

  • Deft driving skills and a bit of luck saved the life of a  skunk Thursday morning. Unfortunately, the critter, either a daredevil or in need of glasses, didn't return the favor.

  • Editor's Note: Due to its size, this column about a planned recovery home on Girl Scout Road will run in two parts, today and in Thursday's edition.

    First I would like to introduce myself. My name is Randy Paris. I am currently the president of Recovery Connection Inc. I am also a resident of Perry County, work in Perry County and have served on boards such as the Perry County Substance Abuse Committee and the Troy Township Water Association.

  • This week students at Perry Central and Tell City schools will join Cannelton students, who have been hitting the books since last Tuesday, in going back to school.

    And with students back in school it means there will be more morning and afternoon traffic on the roads from school buses, parents and high-school students. We ask that everyone be mindful of this when making their morning and afternoon commutes because if you don't, there could be some serious consequences.

  • Two stories, two sets of dog owners, two different levels of respect. The first story made me gag, darned-near literally. The second one is an example of being kind to your pet and your community.

    Story No. 1: I was sitting in my cubicle facing Tell City's Main Street a couple of weeks ago. It was a Sunday and several people were walking down the sidewalk on what was an enjoyable sunny morning. A number of people, drivers as well as pedestrians, were stopping to purchase our Monday paper, which is usually available for purchase before 9 a.m. Sunday.

  • It is now clear that Congress won't send a health-care-reform bill to President Barack Obama before its August recess, a deadline originally set by Obama. It's also clear that whatever bill does emerge from Congress will include significant compromises from what Obama proposed in last year's presidential campaign.

  • For me, Schweizer Fest is a lot like some holidays. There is lots of extra work, so much in fact that finding time to enjoy the actual festivities can be a challenge.  

    The weeks before Schweizer Fest have our staff working on our Zeitung, the special section appearing in today's issue, as well as extra stories about festival events. For the past two years, we've also assembled the official programs that contain the week's schedule as well as other information about Tell City.  

  • It is regretful how long it took me to find time for history. When I was a child, history was conveniently personified in the image of my great uncle Otis during visits to my grandparents' house.

    Otis was a war hero, and on his rare Sunday visits, he was treated like a dignitary. The admiration and awe exhibited by my relatives in his midst were lost on me, though, despite attempts to coax me to listen to this decorated veteran talk about the death march, work camps, prison ships, starvation and torture he endured for three hellish years as a prisoner of war in the Philippines.

  • Canning or freezing home-grown vegetables is a great way to preserve summer's bounty for year-round enjoyment. For beginners, most experts recommend freezing over canning.

    As long as you have plenty of freezer space, this option requires very little initial investment and is a simple and convenient way to preserve fruits and vegetables. Freezing also helps retain the fresh flavor better than canning.

  • We urge the residents of the Tell City-Troy Township school district to get behind the second launch of efforts to make major improvements at the city's high school.

  • A 2004 stopover at a German family's farm inspired an idea that now has my neighbors talking.

    Three years ago, while doing my best to stay on Bavaria's small roads instead of the high-speed superhighways, I pulled my rental car into a gift shop near Lichtenfels in upper Bavaria.

    A large half-timbered home there had been transformed into a small lodge and gift shop while the rest of the farm's buildings, including a dairy, small brewery and livestock barns had kept much of their traditional look and use.

  • As we approach the 2009 Schweizer Fest, many of us start planning to meet up with friends, host members of our family or welcome others from out of town who come back to celebrate our town's heritage. 

    We plan to attend the fair, see the talent show, and for those of age, visit the brau garten.