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Opinion

  • I'm sure plenty of Perry Countians were among the millions of Americans glued to their television screens earlier this month as a silver balloon, thought to be carrying 6-year-old Falcon Heene, floated through the sunny Colorado sky.

    As we all know now, the elf-sized boy was never aboard and it's likely, authorities tell us, that the drama was all a stunt for fame-starved parents. If so, Richard Heene needs to set off in a balloon of his own, en route to prison, joined by his wife if she knew about the stunt.

  • Editor's Note: U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Anthony Farina, a native of St. Meinrad, has written a book about his unit's service in Baghdad during the summer of 2008. "Angels in Sadr City — The Final Battle for Baghdad, Iraq," will be released in coming months and he said profits will go to families of fallen service members. Excerpts from the book forwarded by Farina are published here.

    As I stared deeply into the fine aged wood of the piano, I realized it was the one thing in this world beside the Lord our God that could bring me peace.

  • Editor's Note: Emily Backer wrote this reflection on her summer, including time spent as a volunteer in the offices of the Perry County Convention and Visitors Bur-eau and Perry County Development Corp.

    The summer between one's junior and senior years of college is a pivotal one. Most students either take an amazing but unpaid - as all the good ones seem to be - internship in a big city.

  • "Paranormal Activity" is a low-budget, horror sensation about a young couple, Micah and Katie, who decide to film themselves to get evidence of their haunting.

    Micah seems to find the whole situation funny while Katie takes it quite seriously. Of course, things start to get creepy. While this might sound like the setup to a ghost-hunter TV show, it's actually a great setup for a truly freaky movie.

  • Releases of information each year from the state level have made us wonder whether educational efforts throughout Indiana are properly directed.

    The Indiana Department of Education regularly notifies schools and the public about results of Indiana Statewide Testing for Educational Progress exams. Before those notifications come, however, much effort goes into preparing teachers and students, administering the tests and then explaining the results.

  • While newspapers have shared the pain of an economic recession along with the rest of the country, they remain a valuable institution in Indiana communities.

    Newspapers provide local news like no other source. Newspapers connect consumers and businesses like none other. Newspapers keep local government accountable like none other.

  • Editor's Note: United Way of Perry County's fund-raising campaign is under way. To contribute to the cause, or to learn more about groups the money raised will support, visit www.unitedwayperryco.org or call 547-2577.

    Crisis Connection Inc. would like to thank the United Way of Perry County for its financial support of our organization.  We would also like to thank everyone who contributed to the United Way of Perry County as you helped make this allocation to us possible.  

  • If health-care reform does not occur this year, two congressional leaders who are strongly in favor of it will be largely to blame.

    That's certainly ironic, but it's true because of the hard-line stance that Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid have taken on the so-called "public option," which would allow the federal government to sell health insurance in competition with private companies.

    Pelosi has demanded for months that the final version of any health-care-reform bill contain the public option.

  • I stayed up half the night Thursday listening to the rain pounding the metal roof above my head, wondering if the flooding was going to cover the crops in my low-lying fields.

    By sunup Friday, I was standing on a hill overlooking the Anderson River, which had become a small inland sea covering about 20 acres of cropland. In the distance, the water was edging into a golden field of corn.

    An up-and-down growing season had taken another downturn and it hurt.

  • In the Oct. 5 edition of the Perry County News, guest columnist Jim Adkins told of a dream he had one night.  I found it to be a very interesting tale that had a unique message.  

    Dreaming of the founding fathers must have been exciting and apparently influenced Mr. Adkins very much. However, as a graduate and teacher of U.S. history and government, I found some inaccuracies about the dream.

  • I only know what I read in the paper and I am really confused. The Tell City Electric Department announced Sept. 21 that they are planning to build a new substation on Spring Road.

    Spring Road is a heavily wooded county road and is a meandering extension of Tell Street that extends to an area near the junction of new Indiana 237 and Indiana 37.

    The Electric Department cites the reasons for the new substation as being:

    • Future load growth surrounding the Spring Road substation location.

  • "We invite you to Live United, to reach out to your neighbors in need through the United Way, to give, advocate, and volunteer to help your community grow stronger," said Debbie Elder, United Way of Perry County's campaign chairwoman recently as she spoke to a group of employees in our community, asking them to contribute to the United Way of Perry County's annual fundraising drive.

  • The Obama administration's quest to control the health-insurance industry has dominated the headlines for months, but finally - with the news out of Iran and Afghanistan - foreign policy has again asserted itself. It was almost easy to forget that the United States maintains a worldwide empire, but the reminders came leaping off the front pages and the television screens.

  • There are several longstanding community groups that meet regularly that don't receive - or seek - a lot of attention, but go about their missions successfully year by year.

    One of those is Al-Anon, a mutual support group for people impacted by alcoholism.

  • The battle lasted only two days but all that counted was who won and who lost.

    Two mice, early migrants trying to beat the cold by venturing into my house, bit the dust last week. One had a penchant for potato chips. The second apparently needed help controlling its high blood pressure.

  • I will make this short and sweet. We can't keep going on the way we have been, even though the politicians tell us everything will be OK. Their agenda is greed and control and it has gone unchecked for too long.

    Start preparing for the way of life to which we have grown so accustomed to end some day soon. What does this mean? It means everything we now take for granted: food, clothing, shelter, heat, water, fuel, you name it, will be intermittent at best, and if you can get it, it will be at a premium.

  • I'm uncertain of what awakened me that morning. I heard voices in the living room, but that was not uncommon. My wife usually leaves the radio on low to keep the parakeet company. She's like that.

    I looked at my watch. 3:49 glowed from my wrist. July 4.

    The light was on in the living room, but that was not unusual either. She leaves lights on all over the house as a rule rather than the exception. No, it wasn't the lights that got my attention, nor the low voices. It was the smell of pipe tobacco.

  • "Surrogates," Bruce Willis' latest, is an entertaining, yet unoriginal and problematic, sci-fi film. It takes place about fifteen years in the future, where robotic surrogates handle the day to day life for 99 percent of the world's population, while their owners control them from their homes.

    Think of the world like a live action chat room, where everyone can choose what they look like.

  • Some people say anyone who has nothing to hide shouldn't be bothered by the government looking into their affairs.

    We say that attitude flies in the face of all that is American.

    In America, we don't undergo investigation unless we're suspected of wrongdoing, and evidence exists to support the suspicion. In America, our affairs are nobody's business but our own.

    That was the case, at least, in Old America.

  • National Fire Prevention Week, observed Oct. 4-10 this year, is fast approaching, making it an opportune time to salute  volunteer firefighters who protect our lives and property.

    Fire Prevention Week has been around decades and has its roots in the Great Chicago Fire of Oct. 7-8, 1871, that killed more than 250 people, left 100,000 people homeless and destroyed more than 17,000 structures.