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Opinion

  • I am perplexed. I am confused. I am disappointed. And more importantly, I am ashamed. Why? Because of the recent negative debate and denial of the proposed halfway house on Girl Scout Road.

  • "This is how the world ends, not with a bang, but with a whimper." Director Roland Emmerich would wholeheartedly disagree with T.S. Eliot on that point. Emmerich destroys the planet in the loudest possible way he can and when he’s showcasing the planet’s destruction, "2012" works and is entertaining.

    When Emmerich tries to build characters and emotional connections - not so much.

  • By Jack Joyce

    It is unfortunate when The News reports the failure of the referendum on the Tell City-Troy Township School bond issue. There is no doubt that the school corporation needs to catch up with four decades of neglect.

    There should not be any surprise from current policy boards or current management. Build it and let it fall down from neglect is not what the voters expect from their elected and appointed officials.

  • In the Nov. 19 issue of The News, a few disturbing facts came to light about the number of women in Perry County who smoke or have smoked during pregnancy. It's chilling to realize that 47 percent of our county's pregnant women smoke, not only exposing themselves to the harmful effects of the toxins of cigarettes but exposing their babies to them as well.

  • The Perry County News continues to be far and away the most subscribed-to periodical here at home, with more than 75 percent of households receiving the newspaper via subscriptions or newsstands.

    Community newspapers like ours are still in demand and while papers like ours have certainly felt the effects of the recession, we're faring better than many dailies.

  • I'm writing in response to Indiana Ninth District U.S. House Rep. Baron Hill's column appearing in The News Nov. 12 issue.

  • The American people have been under attack since the end of World War II when Franklin Roosevelt was lifted from his deathbed to attend the Yalta Conference with Stalin and Churchill where he, with strong objections from Churchill, gave Stalin everything he wanted.

    Except for West Berlin, Stalin was given control of eastern Europe. FDR's action set into motion the creation of the Cold War, which has cost the American people many trillions of dollars.

  • Indiana Secretary State of Todd Rokita has been campaigning to have "more sensible criteria" be used to redraw the state's political districts following the 2010 census.

    We agree that the traditional practice of gerrymandering has resulted in some oddly shaped legislative districts in which inhabitants of the northern end may have little or nothing in common with those from the southern end.

  • In 1928, the landmark Tell City High School building was constructed. In 1935 one block away from TCHS I was born. I will soon be 75 and I could not be as healthy as I am without care; care at home, care by a wife and family and care from the community.

  • Some problems are best resolved with guns.

    Not every problem whose best solution is a gun can be expected to occur in extreme southern Perry County, but that's where our law-enforcement resources are concentrated. Driving time from the police and sheriff's departments in Tell City and Cannelton to northern parts of the county can be excruciatingly long for anyone facing a problem that has or might involve violence.

  • The Hoosier State Press Association has been promoting Indiana newspapers for the past several weeks and has provided publications across the state with guest editorials, columns and public-service advertisements promoting the value of newspapers.

    The News has published an editorial and guest column and I found this proposed opinion piece appropriate. It makes mention of issues such as school referendum that have made this publication's pages in recent weeks.

    * * * *

    There are few bargains as good as a newspaper.

  • The date of Nov. 3, 2009, is now in the history books, but I am afraid it has the wrong label attached. Many will look on this day as the day taxpayers saved money by voting down the referendum and therefore not allowing the school system to acquire the funds necessary to complete a proposed remodeling project.

    With this letter, I offer a new name for this date, as it should properly be named, as the day all taxpayers of Tell City-Troy Township lost.

  • Is your youth group, organization, business or family already thinking about helping others this Christmas season? Well, you aren't alone. The Holiday Helpers United are already working on helping those in need this Christmas, and we need your help, too.

  • I have consistently reiterated the need for, and my support of, health care reform throughout my congressional tenure.  And our great nation has been debating how to responsibly reform our health-care system for decades.  

    On Saturday, we took a definitive step forward in advancing this crucial cause by passing the Affordable Health Care for America Act.  

  • Last Tuesday's referendum on the Tell City High School building project divided Troy Township residents. The referendum lost by 23 votes out of 1,521 cast.

    Though most of the editorial staff of The News favored the referendum's passage, some of my co-workers didn't.

    I respect civil debate and the decisions of voters — that's why we have elections — but I have concerns that Tuesday's vote will have long-term negative consequences for our community.

  • Have you thanked a veteran lately? If not, do so this week. Veterans Day is Wednesday and the occasion should prompt all of us to remember and honor the sacrifices made by men and women in uniform, past and present, to safeguard the freedoms we cherish.

    Those sacrifices are still being made. A new generation of men and women are leaving the embrace of mothers and fathers to serve in faraway lands. All give. Some lay down their lives. Others return home with deep physical and mental scars. Veterans still give their all.

  • "Where the Wild Things Are," based on the children's book by Maurice Sendak, is a strange film.  The director, Spike Jonze ("Being John Malkovich," "Adaptation") has stated that the film is more of a movie about childhood than it is a children's movie.

  • Allen Kramer was the consummate high-school teacher, the best educator I ever encountered. This comparison includes the collective company of all my college professors.

    I feared him, this dark-bearded man, mainly for the subjects he taught, his dreaded college-bound mathematics courses.

    I was, in no way, his best student. During his 37 years as a teacher, I'm certain I'm not even listed among his top 1,000 students.

    Still, I learned a great deal from this smart, focused man.

  • A classic problem in trigonometry requests, "Given the length of the shadow that a flagpole casts and angle of inclination that the sun makes with the horizon, compute the height of the flagpole."  

    The late Mr. Allen Kramer taught me to solve that problem.  Given his slight build and average height, his physical shadow was never long.  His academic shadow, however, well beyond his horizon.  

  • County commissioners took the easy way out last month by declining to act on a rezoning request that would have allowed a residence on Girl Scout Road to be converted into a recovery home for men seeking to come clean from drugs.

    Commissioners' inaction doesn't change the fact that there are people, right here, in need of care. We hope the setback doesn't change the commitment others have to working with people trying to overcome addictions.