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Opinion

  • With the national media fixated on the George Zimmerman case and the details involving that night when Trayvon Martin was killed, it has brought to light a topic that is unfortunately still prevalent in our society today. Whether the Zimmerman case dealt with race or not, it invoked strong feelings about racism in our country. It might not even be a stretch to say it has affected discussion about something as innocent as a Cheerios commercial which began airing on national television in June.

  • One recent headline said that some of the U.S.-supplied weapons in Syria’s Civil War have apparently gone to the “wrong “ side.

    The writer meant that they are going to the current Syrian government’s forces instead of the rebels fighting to overthrow that regime.

  • Regardless of which side of the debate Perry Countians come down on, one thing to us is clear. Indiana does not need a divisive constitutional fight over same-sex marriage.

    The issue of gender and marriage has been in the spotlight since U.S. Supreme Court justices in June overturned the federal Defense of Marriage Act – and let stand a lower court ruling in California striking down that state’s ban on same-sex marriage.

  • At the June 17 meeting of the Tell City Board of Works and Safety, residents of the 200 and 300 blocks of Ninth Street gathered to ask for help. Speeding has become a major problem in their neighborhood, they said, and a very dangerous problem, especially when there are several children that live on the street and elderly residents as well.

  • Lee Hamilton, Center for Congress

    For those of us who think and write about democracy, few things are more appealing than a book about how to make it work better. My shelves groan with them. They contain a lot of good and helpful ideas for how to make government and civil institutions stronger and more effective.
    But over time, I’ve concluded that as complicated as democracy’s workings might be, one thing matters above all else: effective leadership. It might not guarantee results, but without it, nothing much happens.

  • Vince Luecke, Editor
    editor@perrycountynews.com
    It’s human nature to be curious when big news events occur, whether large fires, drug labs or storms like last week’s tornado.
    But I don’t know why so many people put themselves and others in danger by trying to get first-hand views. There are too many sightseers and police – especially when they just arrive on the scene – don’t have time to cordon off the scene or shoo away spectators.

  • As if the forces of voter disenfranchisement were not out in sufficient numbers already, the Supreme Court opened a door and posted a welcome sign over it.
    They issued several rulings last week, and those regarding gay marriage dominated the resulting media coverage. Those rulings are important, but because far more Americans are voters than are gay, we respectfully draw your attention to their 5-4 striking down of a formula key to the implementation of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

  • Most Americans hate it when their government tries to pull a fast one on them by shrouding its actions in secrecy.

    They reason correctly that if government officials truly believed their moves were legitimate, they wouldn’t feel the need to try to hide them from the public.

    Thus it was no surprise that the recent disclosure of the National Security Agency’s secretly intercepting millions of telephone records and e-mails sparked outrage by many from both ends of the political spectrum, though it also had defenders on both sides of the aisle.

  • It’s hard for us to point fingers at any one person whose property is in need of repair, but the sorry state of the Obrecht House on Tell City’s Seventh Street is one that warrants community concern and this editorial.

    The home needs repaired and restored or it needs to be torn down. It’s that simple.

    Let us say, up front, that we hope the home is saved and we would be overjoyed if the current owner, Carolyn Barr, would follow through with her pledge, published in the newspaper a few weeks ago, to return the home to its past glory.

  • They looked a gift horse rescue in the mouth, then failed to act based on what they thought they saw.

    We urge the county council to invite Horse Rescue South to their next meeting, and to listen this time to what they have to offer you.

    As we reported Thursday, you did a lot more talking than listening.

    You missed their offer.

  • President Ronald Reagan is credited with asserting, “the most terrifying words in the English language are ‘I’m from the government and I’m here to help.’ ”

  • A journalist’s job, in the simplest definition, is to ask questions and report the facts they discover from that information. Not all of the questions reporters ask day in and day out are popular ones. In fact, it’s not a stretch to say our job is quite possibly one of the most disliked. However, love us or hate us, we cannot imagine that most people would agree with the recent actions of the Department of Justice and the Obama administration.

  • Advocates of a year-round school calendar believe that with shorter breaks children will retain more information than they do with the current 2½-month summer vacation.

    Yet as recently as the late 1980s, then Indiana Lt. Gov. John Mutz was advocating a return to a school year that begins after Labor Day and ends by Memorial Day, giving students slightly more than a three-month summer vacation. Among his reasons for that suggestion was it would help the state’s tourism industry.

  • Want to know what’s causing a lot of people in Washington to work long hours right now? Here’s a hint: it’s not immigration reform or gun control or, for that matter, any other legislation coming down the pike. Instead, it’s a pair of three-year-old laws.
    The Affordable Care Act, known to most Americans as Obamacare, and the Wall Street reform act known as “Dodd-Frank” both became law in 2010.

  • When ISTEP tests roll around, students, teachers and parents should be focused on applying classroom learning to the test, not worrying if the testing system itself will work.

    That wasn’t the case across many areas of the state, including Perry County, late last month. On April 29, Hoosier students taking the online multiple-choice portion of the Indiana Statewide Testing for Educational Progress-Plus exam experienced frozen screens and in many cases, an inability to finish the test.

  • The cycle of social-media-aided poor judgment hit our home state recently.

    A few weekends back, the Indiana University chapter of the Kappa Delta Sorority threw a homeless-themed costume party at which people dressed up in soiled clothes, rubbed dirt on their faces and brandished cardboard signs containing insensitive remarks. One read, “Why lie, it’s for booze.”

  • Memo to teachers and other authority figures nationwide: Respond to actual threats where they exist. Where no threat exists, leave our children alone.

    A teacher in West Virginia demanded that a high-school student remove a T-shirt decorated with the National Rifle Association logo and a picture of a rifle, according to media reports last week. Also adorning the shirt were the words, “Protect your right.”

  • Most think the U.S. Supreme Court will issue a ruling this spring on whether gay marriages are legal, but that may not occur. Instead the court may simply let each state decide that issue.

    Two related cases questioning the constitutionality of gay-marriage bans are currently before the Supreme Court. One involves California’s Proposition 8, in which that state’s voters banned gay marriages in November 2008.

  • If a new hotel along Tell City’s Seventh Street is feasible economically, let’s not waste time. Let’s make it happen.

    That was the message Tony Pappano delivered to the Perry County Convention and Visitors Bureau a few weeks ago. Pappano is a grant administrator and community visionary who for years has helped our area leverage grant funds. He was instrumental in Tell City being awarded and successfully administering more than $2 million in Neighborhood Stabilization Fund grants over the past few years.

  • Stop littering!

    It’s a message often repeated but one that has apparently yet to sink in the minds of the litterbugs of Perry County whose ugly handiwork can be seen alongside highways and county roads.