.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Opinion

  • “President Barack Obama glossed over some inconvenient truths Tuesday in his climate-change speech to the United Nations,” the Associated Press reported Wednesday.

    In a report at the Yahoo News site headlined, “Fact Check: Obama’s UN speech spins statistics,” the news agency responded to five points made by Obama or his administration about progress this nation has made toward reversing practices many scientists agree are contributing to global warming.

  • Henry Ford famously said, “History is bunk.” But most leaders in any walk of life feel history is important because it is what makes the present and lessons from it can be used to guide our future.

    With Indiana’s bicentennial coming up in 2016, many groups, including one here in Perry County, have begun planning several worthwhile events that will help us reflect on our state’s history.

    Naturally the Indiana Historical Society is getting involved in planning for the bicentennial, as well.

  • September is Suicide Prevention Month and today begins National Suicide Prevention Week. This year’s theme is “Suicide Prevention: One World Connected.”

    The Perry County News joins others across the nation this week in supporting suicide prevention.

    According to the most recent statistics (2011) released by the Center for Disease Control, Indiana ranks 29th in the country for suicide rates and rankings among all age groups combined; 34th for people 65 and older and 39th for 15- to 24-year-olds.

  • Cities across the nation are trying to revitalize their downtown areas, and Tell City is no exception. The planned River Pointe project on Seventh Street on the former Tell City Chair Co. property is a big step in that direction.

  • Employees of the Cannelton City Schools Corp. can expect nothing that’s backed by the handshakes or signatures of its leadership, we noted in this space in October 2012.

    They proved that again in denying an incentive bonus to Bridget Bruggeman and other teachers.

  • In the 1960s and ’70s Sen. Birch Bayh of Indiana became the first person since the United States’ founding fathers to write two amendments to the Constitution.

    Bayh was the main author of the 25th Amendment, which created a process for an orderly transition of power in the case of death, disability or resignation of the president and a method of selecting a vice president when a vacancy occurs in that office.

    He also wrote the 26th Amendment, which lowered the voting age from 21 to 18.

  • If you need to warn someone of danger, and you know they’re hard of hearing, you’re likely to speak up.

    The Indiana Department of Transportation should have spoken up about their plans for the intersection of 12th and Tell streets in Tell City.

    They admitted they knew some of us are difficult to reach and they had to know they were going to create a potentially dangerous situation when they removed lane markings from that intersection.

  • How America cares for its veterans is indicative of its values as a nation. We’re confident the vast majority of citizens agree that health care for military vets through the country’s network of Veterans Affairs hospitals should meet or exceed common-sense expectations.

    Unfortunately, what’s been discovered in recent weeks about the troubling wait times for new patients at VA hospitals reveals there is a disconnect between intent and reality.

  • One of the speakers at the Tell City Junior-Senior High School graduation ceremony this year made a point that made us stop and think for a moment. We can’t recall who said it or the exact words, but the point was this:

    We entered kindergarten in August 2001.

    The events which occurred since then, in particular those of September 2001, have made this a very different world compared to how it looked that first day.

  • For years several groups have been trying to get the Washington Redskins National Football League team to change its name.

    The issue was brought to the forefront again last week after Donald Sterling, owner of the Los Angeles Clippers basketball team, was recorded making racist comments. He was fined $2.5 million by the NBA and permanently banned from operating the team.

  • We are as baffled as Randy Cole said he is that he’s having to fight to get a tax exemption for the former Tell City Junior High School.

    As we reported April 28, Cole appeared before the county council four days earlier to seek their support. There was nothing they could do for him, they said.

  • Few property annexations, especially of the size Tell City has tackled over the past year, are accomplished easily or without considerable debate. That has certainly been the case this spring as the Tell City Common Council debated, sought public input and adopted an ordinance adding 1,776 acres into the community.

    As we reported in Thursday’s issue, a group of landowners opposed to their properties being annexed is in the first stages of filing a remonstrance.

  • Someone approaches you and says, “you have a problem. I can help you with it and I might even be able to find money so you don’t have to pay for its solution.”

    How do you react? Do you dismiss the offer and the person making it?

    Jim Carter, president of the Humane Society of Perry County, made such an offer to the county commissioners.

    He was met with what appeared to be evasiveness.

  • A new law affecting motorized scooters passed by the Indiana General Assembly this year makes sense but could have been a little better.

    Scooters, also known as motorized bicycles or mopeds, are now required to be licensed and their drivers are now required to have state-issued identification cards with scooter endorsements.

    Those IDs and scooter license plates can be obtained at the Indiana Bureau of Motor Vehicles for a $17.30 fee plus a $10 excise charge.

  • When a disaster strikes, will you be part of the problem or part of the solution?

    Just as it seems we’re coming out from under an onslaught of harsh weather, a declaration by the county commissioners a week ago reminds us: The severe-weather season is coming.

    They voted at their March 3 meeting to designate March 16-22 Severe Weather Preparedness Week.

  • An effort to put together new academic standards for Indiana schools continues, as does the move away from Common Core State Standards.

    The Indiana State Board of Education is working to develop kindergarten-through-12th grade standards for Indiana separate from Common Core. Our desire is that the standards be challenging and realistic. But just as the old saying goes that a camel is a horse designed by committee, danger exists for the workability of the standards the state board is amassing.

  • Word of rental-housing tax credits awarded last week to a future project in downtown Tell City is good news for our community and Perry County. A healthy vibrant downtown is what every city needs and for Tell City, the multimillion project known as River Pointe will bring not only development and construction jobs to the city, but people.

  • Following three years of political jousting, the Agricultural Act of 2014, commonly referred to as the farm bill, finally passed through the House and Senate and was signed by President Obama Feb. 7.

    And while this important omnibus bill certainly has flaws in some areas, we think it has merit in its preservation and strengthening of several key conservation programs, especially as it pertains to keeping Perry County’s water, soil and forests healthy.

  • On his 1983 solo album Phil Everly sang, “When I’m dead and gone, I don’t want nobody to mope beside my bed.” But for the millions of people who love rock ’n’ roll music, it is hard not to mourn the passing earlier this month of one of the pioneers of that genre.

  • Seldom has an interview in a publication known more for its coverage of men’s fashions than its profiles of celebrities generated such a national conversation.

    We’re speaking, of course, of the GQ interview of Phil Robertson of “Duck Dynasty” fame. Robertson, patriarch of the top-rated cable show, was asked about his view of homosexuality and he obligingly shared his personal views that homosexuality is wrong and a sin. That made lots of people’s wings flutter. Robertson also raised a ruckus with his views on race.