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Opinion

  • Someone approaches you and says, “you have a problem. I can help you with it and I might even be able to find money so you don’t have to pay for its solution.”

    How do you react? Do you dismiss the offer and the person making it?

    Jim Carter, president of the Humane Society of Perry County, made such an offer to the county commissioners.

    He was met with what appeared to be evasiveness.

  • A new law affecting motorized scooters passed by the Indiana General Assembly this year makes sense but could have been a little better.

    Scooters, also known as motorized bicycles or mopeds, are now required to be licensed and their drivers are now required to have state-issued identification cards with scooter endorsements.

    Those IDs and scooter license plates can be obtained at the Indiana Bureau of Motor Vehicles for a $17.30 fee plus a $10 excise charge.

  • When a disaster strikes, will you be part of the problem or part of the solution?

    Just as it seems we’re coming out from under an onslaught of harsh weather, a declaration by the county commissioners a week ago reminds us: The severe-weather season is coming.

    They voted at their March 3 meeting to designate March 16-22 Severe Weather Preparedness Week.

  • An effort to put together new academic standards for Indiana schools continues, as does the move away from Common Core State Standards.

    The Indiana State Board of Education is working to develop kindergarten-through-12th grade standards for Indiana separate from Common Core. Our desire is that the standards be challenging and realistic. But just as the old saying goes that a camel is a horse designed by committee, danger exists for the workability of the standards the state board is amassing.

  • Word of rental-housing tax credits awarded last week to a future project in downtown Tell City is good news for our community and Perry County. A healthy vibrant downtown is what every city needs and for Tell City, the multimillion project known as River Pointe will bring not only development and construction jobs to the city, but people.

  • Following three years of political jousting, the Agricultural Act of 2014, commonly referred to as the farm bill, finally passed through the House and Senate and was signed by President Obama Feb. 7.

    And while this important omnibus bill certainly has flaws in some areas, we think it has merit in its preservation and strengthening of several key conservation programs, especially as it pertains to keeping Perry County’s water, soil and forests healthy.

  • On his 1983 solo album Phil Everly sang, “When I’m dead and gone, I don’t want nobody to mope beside my bed.” But for the millions of people who love rock ’n’ roll music, it is hard not to mourn the passing earlier this month of one of the pioneers of that genre.

  • Seldom has an interview in a publication known more for its coverage of men’s fashions than its profiles of celebrities generated such a national conversation.

    We’re speaking, of course, of the GQ interview of Phil Robertson of “Duck Dynasty” fame. Robertson, patriarch of the top-rated cable show, was asked about his view of homosexuality and he obligingly shared his personal views that homosexuality is wrong and a sin. That made lots of people’s wings flutter. Robertson also raised a ruckus with his views on race.

  • It’s the American way to remonstrate against the government when the legislature’s actions don’t coincide with the populaces’ opinion on the direction they lead the nation. The United States was built on such principles.

    But in the 237 years since colonists first put pen to paper to declare they would no longer accept a despot monarchy that ruled the people past the point of oppression, the average American’s voice has been somewhat lost when it comes to choices their leaders make.

  • During the Thanksgiving and Christmas season we focus on giving and gratitude.

    The gift of organ donation is not often a topic of conversation, but people should be aware that one donor can potentially save the lives of up to eight people.

    More than 600 Hoosiers are on waiting lists for organ, tissue and eye donations, according to the Indiana Organ Procurement Organization.

    Nationwide, more than 90,000 people are hoping to receive a life-saving transplant; sadly, it’s estimated that 17 people die every day waiting for such a transplant.

  • Once Congress was populated with statesmen who debated the issues and voted on bills based on their merits, not based on the latest polls.

    Their decisions were also made on what was in a bill, not on who proposed it, as members of Congress often reached across the aisle to find bipartisan support on issues. And if members had objections to a bill, they proposed a viable alternative instead of just saying no and hoping the issue would disappear.

    Sadly, those days appear to be gone.

  • A revolution is occurring that could change the nation in very fundamental ways. People, many of them teachers, are speaking out against standardization in education.

  • Most of us with a life in the work force have goals related to our jobs. Some are set for us. Others are our ideas. In the best of situations, workplace objectives flow from a meeting of several minds and help guide our work in successful ways.

    The issue of why the Tell City-Troy Township School Board has not conducted an evaluation of Schools Superintendent Lynn Blinzinger has led or been part of several stories over the past few months. A state law passed two years ago requires boards to conduct annual evaluations of superintendents.

  • With the national media fixated on the George Zimmerman case and the details involving that night when Trayvon Martin was killed, it has brought to light a topic that is unfortunately still prevalent in our society today. Whether the Zimmerman case dealt with race or not, it invoked strong feelings about racism in our country. It might not even be a stretch to say it has affected discussion about something as innocent as a Cheerios commercial which began airing on national television in June.

  • One recent headline said that some of the U.S.-supplied weapons in Syria’s Civil War have apparently gone to the “wrong “ side.

    The writer meant that they are going to the current Syrian government’s forces instead of the rebels fighting to overthrow that regime.

  • Regardless of which side of the debate Perry Countians come down on, one thing to us is clear. Indiana does not need a divisive constitutional fight over same-sex marriage.

    The issue of gender and marriage has been in the spotlight since U.S. Supreme Court justices in June overturned the federal Defense of Marriage Act – and let stand a lower court ruling in California striking down that state’s ban on same-sex marriage.

  • At the June 17 meeting of the Tell City Board of Works and Safety, residents of the 200 and 300 blocks of Ninth Street gathered to ask for help. Speeding has become a major problem in their neighborhood, they said, and a very dangerous problem, especially when there are several children that live on the street and elderly residents as well.

  • Lee Hamilton, Center for Congress

    For those of us who think and write about democracy, few things are more appealing than a book about how to make it work better. My shelves groan with them. They contain a lot of good and helpful ideas for how to make government and civil institutions stronger and more effective.
    But over time, I’ve concluded that as complicated as democracy’s workings might be, one thing matters above all else: effective leadership. It might not guarantee results, but without it, nothing much happens.

  • Vince Luecke, Editor
    editor@perrycountynews.com
    It’s human nature to be curious when big news events occur, whether large fires, drug labs or storms like last week’s tornado.
    But I don’t know why so many people put themselves and others in danger by trying to get first-hand views. There are too many sightseers and police – especially when they just arrive on the scene – don’t have time to cordon off the scene or shoo away spectators.

  • As if the forces of voter disenfranchisement were not out in sufficient numbers already, the Supreme Court opened a door and posted a welcome sign over it.
    They issued several rulings last week, and those regarding gay marriage dominated the resulting media coverage. Those rulings are important, but because far more Americans are voters than are gay, we respectfully draw your attention to their 5-4 striking down of a formula key to the implementation of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.