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Features

  • ROCKY POINT – Summer and fall are long gone but Jim Weeks' Rocky Point Grille is growing its menu and adding seats to serve customers year-round.

    Weeks, a retired conservation officer with years of experience in food service, including hosting pig roasts for gatherings, purchased the business more than a year ago and recently installed a heavy-plastic enclosure over a large exterior deck. That has allowed him to seat customers outside, giving diners a view of the Ohio River and spectacular sunsets.

  • CANNELTON – Every month a group of women gathers at the Cannelton Public Library to discuss literature, trips members have taken or listen to programs covering various topics.

    These women are members of an almost 100-year-old organization that was started Sept. 14, 1914, in Cannelton. According to a 1965 News article, the group was organized by Mrs. David Rodman, Mrs. Lee Rodman and Patricia Rodman.

  • TELL CITY – More than 600 students have taken advantage of offerings at the Perry County Learning Academy in the nearly five years it's been open, earning either high-school diplomas they might never have received or the right to walk across the commencement platform with members of their original graduating classes.

  • PERRY COUNTY – Local high-school students learning the basics of entrepreneurship  this fall may become tomorrow’s  business movers and shakers.

    That’s the hope of local volunteers working with Junior Achievement, an international organization that has worked with young people for nearly 90 years, including Perry County students “test-driving” a new pilot program.

  • NEWTONVILLE – Corey Richards looks like an all-American boy, bubbly and sometimes fidgety. He shakes your hand dressed in jeans with dirty knees and is quick to flash a big grin that almost reaches from ear to ear.

    Corey, a 7-year-old second-grader at Chrisney Elementary School, suffers from a metabolic disorder that keeps his body from being able to break down certain amino acids, causing them to build up in his blood to the point where they become toxic.

    “It becomes a poison in his system,” the boy’s mother, Jennifer Richards, said.

  • Today is the 33rd Great American Smokeout, and the American Cancer Society continues its legacy of providing free resources to help smokers quit.

    The Great American Smokeout was inaugurated in 1976 to inspire and encourage smokers to quit for one day. Now, 44.2 percent of the 45.3 million Americans who smoke have attempted to quit for at least one day in the past year, and the Great American Smokeout remains a great opportunity to encourage people to commit to making a long-term plan to quit for good.