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Features

  • TROY - A stoutly built stone structure possibly used as an icehouse in Troy will find a new home in the Shubael Little Pioneer Village. St. Pius Catholic Church has donated the stone building, which is located near Indiana 66. It will be disassembled block by block this fall and restored at the village near Rocky Point.

    Well over a century old, the structure will be rebuilt to its original standards, including a wood shake roof, said Chuck Poehlein, developer of the village that already includes several log cabins.

  • TELL CITY - The Tell City Regional Arts Association hosted its second Schweizer Fest Art Show Aug. 7-8 in the upstairs gallery of City Hall. This year's show featured artwork constructed from natural items as well as recycled materials.

    Adult - Natural Art

    First: Anne Wilkins, Wondrous Guidance, painted stone.

    Second: Anne Wilkins, painted stone

    Adult - Recycled Art

    First: Larry Fleming, fish neon light

    Second: Roger Reynolds,  horse and buggy carving.

    Third: Roger Reynolds, owl carving.

  • TELL CITY - The finals for next month's Shoot for the Stars singing competition are set. Four gents, Glenn Cronin, David McKinney, Ronald Riley and Dillon McKinney, earned berths Sunday to compete in the Sept. 20 finals in City Hall Park.

  • DOOLITTLE MILLS - Over the years Bethel Christian Church has gone through many changes. This year is no different as the congregation celebrates its centennial.

    In 1909, the Doolittle Mills church building, already in use by a church congregation, was purchased from Jordan Williams in Crawford County and moved and rebuilt on a half acre of land donated by John Roberson. According to an early history of the church, all of the labor was donated and more land was donated by Iola Ransom and Ronnie Wright.

  • Opening ceremonies Wednesday kicked off Tell City's 51st Schweizer Fest. Activities continue through Saturday in City Hall Park. Here's a rundown of some activities.

    Today

    • Today through Saturday - Schweizer Fest Market in City Hall Park. For more information, contact the Perry County Convention and Visitors Bureau at 547-7933.

    • 5:30 p.m. Schweizer Fest Testimonial Dinner and Program honoring Indiana Farm Bureau Insurance at Knights of Columbus Home. Sponsored by the Perry County Chamber of Commerce.

  • TELL CITY - A packed fellowship hall at Evangelical United Church of Christ was the scene of Monday evening's Junior Miss and Miss Schweizer Fest pageants. This was the second year for the event, which began with last year's sesquicentennial.

    In the Miss Schweizer Fest Pageant, Monica Perryman was awarded the crown with Shayna Richardson named first alternate. Kelsie Bland took awards for Miss Photogenic and Miss Congeniality. In the Junior Miss pageant, Crystal Peter was crowned queen, with Darian Oliva first alternate and Kaylee Henderson second alternate.

  • TELL CITY - Schweizer Fest participants shouldn't miss their chance to learn more about the city's rich history. The Tell City Historical Society Museum will be open daily through Sunday and will offer historical movies about the community.

    Museum hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. today, Friday and Saturday and 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday.

    Programs for self-guided walking tours of the city are available at the museum for $2.

    Historical photographs are located around the city's historic districts and are sponsored by ATTC Manufacturing and the historical society.

  • TELL CITY - Beth Fortwendel has angels on her shoulders, lots of them, offering reassurance and comfort in the face of a life-threatening disease and help raising money for a stem-cell transplant that could take place as early as next month.

    Fortwendel, who lives in Hancock County, Ky., but grew up in Perry County, suffers from scleroderma, an autoimmune disorder that hardens the skin and often harms organs. The impacts on victims vary and Fortwendel's case has become more serious over the past year and threatens to shorten her life.

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  • The first Sunday shower of the month is an important one in my house. That's the morning I give my Nordic skin a careful examination. I twist and turn my torso while gazing into a mirror, examining areas I don't normally explore, like the soles of my feet, eyelids, the skin between my toes and all those places where the  sun doesn't shine. You get the picture.

    I'm looking for possible signs of skin cancer and my monthly Sunday routine might one day save my life. You should consider doing something similar.

  • Skin cancer is the most common of all cancers, afflicting more than a million Americans each year, a number that is rising rapidly. It is also the easiest to cure, if diagnosed and treated early. When allowed to progress, however, skin cancer can result in disfigurement and even death.

    Who Should Do It?

  • TELL CITY - Sunday afternoon will see City Hall Park rocking as the next round of the Tell City Regional Arts Asociation's Shoot for the Stars competition returns with 14 competitors. Joining them will be two musical acts, Naked and Abby Jenkins.

    The first Shoot for the Stars competitors will step onto the the park gazebo's stage around 2:45 p.m. with the two guest performers playing later in the afternoon.