.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Features

  • TELL CITY - Shasta Simpson had no intentions of driving three hours straight to Nashville late at night July 14. But to make it to Bridgestone Arena in downtown Nashville before 5 a.m., that's exactly what she would have to do. If she arrived after 5 a.m., she would not get a wristband and would not get a turn on stage in front of an American Idol producer.

    The only problem was trying to decide whether she wanted to go or not. The 24-year-old Tell City resident, who said she has always loved singing and music, wasn't sure if she wanted to go audition.

  • St. Augustine Catholic Church in Leopold's annual picnic Sunday meant fun for hundreds who enjoyed home-cooked dinners and tried their luck at bingo, a cake wheel, silent auction and quilt raffle. Summer brings several events at area churches and will be followed by autumn shooting matches and fall festivals. The events ensure busy days for congregation members, who keep alive a tradition of working side by side, just as they pray together each week.

  • TELL CITY - For the past 60 years, Dorothy "Dot" Kessner has been apart of 4-H as a leader and guide for the youth of Perry County. But her love and involvement of the association stretches back further than just 60 years.

  •  

     

  • TELL CITY - The Ohio River was critical in the development of Perry County and the United States as expansion headed westward.

    In addition, the river impacted the French and Indian War, the American Revolution in the West, the Lewis and Clark expedition, the Underground Railroad, the Civil War and the steamboat era.

    Area residents will have a chance to learn more about our area's ties to the river Thursday during an informational program given by author Rick Rhodes at the Tell City-Perry County Public Library.

  • LEOPOLD – This past semester the Perry Central economics classes competed in the state-wide Stock Market Game Simulation. Three teams finished 1-3 in the Evansville District among 289 teams competing. These three teams also finished second, fourth and 15th in the state out of 1,727 teams competing.

  • The commissioners room in the county courthouse became a training center of sorts Wednesday evening as county rescue-squad members and dispatchers took part in a cardiopulmonary resuscitation recertification class. The group trained on adult- and infant-sized mannequins with compressible chests and tiltable heads. The use of automated external defibrillators was also demonstrated. AEDs located in many public buildings and schools, including the courthouse, provide immediate care for people suffering from sudden cardiac arrest.

  • Top Teams

    This year's Perry County Relay for Life raised $49,144.88, well more than the $36,000 goal set by organizers. The amount was also higher than last year's total.

    Top fundraising teams were:

    First place: Wolf Pack, $18,393.22

    Second place: Rainbow of Angels, $5,182

    Third place: Lifesavers, $4,648.32

    The top youth team was Drew's Super Team, whose members raised $4,054.54.

  • A Relay for Life team's determination to honor the memory of a family member and friend who succumbed to cancer in January has raised more than $18,000 for the American Cancer Society.

    The Wolf Pack team, named in honor of Debbie (Wolf) Dickman, was the top fundraising team during this year's event. Wolf Pack team members raised $18,393.22 and walked more than 200 miles Saturday and Sunday.