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Today's Opinions

  • LETTER: TC’s Neighborhood Watch follows the rules

    I am writing in response to an editorial in The Perry County News Nov. 28. First of all, as founder of Tell City Neighborhood Watch, I would like to thank the community and city officials for the support we have received in response of launching the Neighborhood Watch program.

  • COLUMN: Zoeller: Courts must hold Congress’ authority in check

    By GREG ZOELLER, Indiana Attorney General

    On Nov. 14, the United States Supreme Court announced that it will hear five-and-a-half hours of oral argument on a lawsuit brought by 26 states, including Indiana, challenging the constitutionality of the new Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

    Many people have asked why I oppose the new federal health-care law and I have gone out of my way to speak to those who support the new federal program and explain my decision to join the multistate lawsuit.  

  • COLUMN: St. Nicholas visits tonight

    By VINCE LUECKE, Editor

    I haven’t yet decided which old shoe I am going to put out for Nicholas’ visit tonight. With any luck, I will find a few pieces of chocolate inside the next morning.

    I think I will put the shoe outside The News office. St. Nicholas hasn’t been able to find me the last couple of years in New Boston, so I’m going to make it easier on him.

  • EDITORIAL: Teen right to defend opinion, even if politician, school disagree

    A Kansas high-school senior recently caused quite a commotion when a tweet she made as a joke with her friends caught national attention.

    Emma Sullivan, an 18-year-old student of Shawnee Mission East High School in Fairway, Kan., traveled with a Youth in Government program to see Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback speak. After hearing his speech, Sullivan decided she didn’t support his thoughts and took to social-media site, Twitter, to voice her disapproval.

  • COLUMN: Rethinking Education Reform

    By JAMES GUTHRIE, Guest Columnist

    As budget crises deepen across the country, many fear that education funding could be put on the chopping block. If school budgets are reduced, will it be possible to get a high-quality education in public schools?

    The simple answer is yes. A high-quality education might be priceless in today’s economy. But it doesn’t have to be overly expensive.

  • COLUMN: Good use for a spare $25

    By VINCE LUECKE, Editor

    I very seldom buy scratch-off lottery tickets but grabbed three the other day. I won $25, not a bad return for $3. I visited Churchill Downs a couple of weekends ago and dropped more than that on some races. Luckily, I ended the day only a small loser.

    I stared at the bills and wondered what I’d do with the money. Like a lot of people my age and younger, I don’t carry much cash. I use a debit card to buy groceries and gas. My paycheck is direct deposited and most bills are paid online.

  • EDITORIAL: Police canines pull their weight

    The News does an admirable job of reporting on the successes – and the occasional failure – of police officers, but we can’t remember the last time we singled out the work of police dogs.

    There are three of them at work in Perry County. Trooper Mark Lehmkuhler’s German shepherd Brote, Tell City Patrolman Derrick Lawalin’s German shepherd Jago and Cannelton Police Department Sgt. Lee Hall’s Eric.

  • EDITORIAL: Neighborhood Watch goals admirable; volunteers should focus on neighborhoods

    A new Neighborhood Watch program is under way in Tell City, offering extra sets of eyes and ears in the fight against criminal activity.

    We support the program’s goals of providing information to police officers about possible vandalism, gang activity and other wrongdoing. We also acknowledge volunteers’ stated efforts to promote disaster preparedness and education on crime prevention.