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Today's Opinions

  • Don't forget the turn signal

    Had the young-lady driver been able to decipher the words coming from my lips, she might have rammed her blue Buick into my front bumper.

    The woman's sin didn't justify the bad words or the fist-pounding I gave my steering wheel. But I was still peeved and wondered why the driver - and a growing number of others like her - don't use their vehicles' turn signals.

    The lady driving the Buick was coming down the hill in Troy, leading a parade of cars and trucks through the hillside construction zone between Troy and Tell City.

  • Hard work, time promise to make 50th Schweizer Fest, sesquicentennial memorable

    This year has flown by and it's only a short three weeks until Tell City kicks off its 50th annual Schweizer Fest and sesquicentennial celebration.

    Here at The News, we've been working on a variety of activities to get ourselves ready for the event. We're all working on special publications and stories for the celebration as well as making and assembling items for our window display and a float for the Aug. 2 parade.

  • Home-schooling curriculum should be standardized

    In February a California state appeals court ruled that unless parents have recognized teaching credentials they cannot home-school their kids.

    The court's opinion, citing a state education law, said, "Parents do not have a constitutional right to home-school their children."

    Advocates of home-schooling responded strongly against the ruling.

  • Editing birthday list a tad sad

    I've spent the past few weeks removing names from the birthday lists The News have maintained for many years.

    The roster of birthdays run on Thursday's Page 2B and while we've tried out best to keep it updated, it's not always been as high a priority as it should have been.

    That changed a few weeks ago when I was politely raked over the coals by a woman whose husband's name was still on the list a year after he died.

  • It's time to talk about energy

    Pressure is mounting in Congress to do something about climate change. And while political debates in Washington, D.C., may seem far away, the outcome will have a direct impact on Southern Indiana Power, our cooperative members and other electric consumers.

    Already our nation faces a looming energy crisis, with demand for electricity ready to outstrip supply. Unless significantly more power plants are placed into service soon, consumers could experience brownouts and even rolling blackouts in the not-too-distant future.

  • Make the most of each day

    An old Jesuit priest once told me during a 30-day retreat about the value of getting out of bed each morning and acknowledging the possibility that the coming day may be your last.

    "Sooner or later, you'll be right," he quipped.

    For me, the saying is a reminder of the dangers of putting things off, saying what I could do today, I'll wait and do tomorrow. Sooner or later, we run out of tomorrows.

  • Urge representatives to remain true to American principles

    To varying degrees throughout its history, this nation has viewed itself as practicing the most honorable of governmental forms. We've proudly noted that people of other lands looked to us with envy, wishing they, too, could enjoy a national fabric threaded with fairness and respect for the rule of law.

    One recent development soiled that fabric. Another reinforced it.

  • City needs to address stormwater

    I wanted to "take my head out of the sand" (as Cannelton Mayor Smokey Graves said in a June 12 News story) long enough to explain my position as a former Cannelton city councilman regarding the city's sewer rates.

    Let me preface this by saying that it is my understanding that our community is essentially set up as a user on Tell City's sewer system.

    We pay that community monthly based upon how much sewage we send them for treatment. Our rates as individual household users can then be affected by that monthly cost, somewhat of a trickle-down effect.