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Today's Opinions

  • Working by the moonlight

    Ivan James was a rare gem of a man who inhabited the hinterland of northeast Perry County.

    His occupation was farming, a most noble pursuit he'd been born into. Ivan was a wide-brimmed-hat sort of fellow, blue-denim overalls, handkerchief spilling out the back pocket, whittlin' knife hidden in the front one.

    His hands were out-of-doors worn from a lifetime of hard use, but there was a softness in his eyes that revealed something of his old soul.

  • Vigilance is voters' sacred duty

    Our duty in the voting booth is a sacred one even in good times. The gravity of our task is multiplied many times when we're sending our loved ones into the paths of bombs and bullets, and when national and global financial systems are collapsing. For that reason, the trust we place in our voting systems must be absolute.

  • ACORN allegations overblown

    Matt Hayko's concern about Barack Obama and ACORN (Oct. 20 letter to the editor) is misplaced and the issue is important enough to not be left unanswered.

    ACORN, or the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now, is a grassroots community group that has been involved, since its inception in 1970, in working to raise voter turnout in minority and poor districts that in the past have often been targeted for quite well-documented drives, by whichever party is in power, to suppress votes.

  • Attacks on Obama sign of desperation

    In a letter to the editor published in The Perry County News Oct. 20, Jim Adkins alludes to a comparison of Sen. Barack Obama to Adolf Hitler.

    This in itself describes how desperate some people are to elect their choice to public office. I receive e-mails and have had conversations with people all throughout this campaign season with questions about our two candidates for president.

    I have received racist e-mails and ones that refer to Barack Obama as a Muslim. I have heard comments that he will take away my guns.

  • Don't forget local Nov. 4 races

    For those men and women who live and breathe politics, the past few weeks have been heavenly. Indiana is in the presidential spotlight and Hoosiers will have a real say two weeks from tomorrow in deciding who will live in the White House for the next four years.

    It doesn't get much better than this for political junkies and as evidenced by the letters in this and past issues of The News, lots of us are truly interested in Nov. 4 races. It seems to be working. I just hope other races aren't being overlooked.

  • Parks board deserves congratulations for seeing Eagles Bluff project through

    The Perry County Parks and Recreation Department deserves congratulations for its perseverance in seeing the Eagles Bluff Park project through to completion.

    Building a new visitors center and restroom building, repaving the deteriorated parking lot and entrance to the park, rebuilding the deck overlooking the Ohio River and the Cannelton Locks and Dam and putting new fencing around that deck had been planned by the parks board since it purchased the property from the Army Corps of Engineers in 1999.

  • An ounce of prevention ...

    Now that I am interested in maintaining my youthful experimental life and living longer and growing younger, there are things I think about and wish to share with you. This summer I have come into contact with many people who are having medical appointments or hospital stays for a great variety of illnesses.

    My overall generalization about what I have heard from patient reports is the focus of this writing. Please allow me to say this. There is a serious disconnect between the patients and their medical experience.

  • No more toilet paper, please

    I woke up one recent Saturday to find toilet paper strewn across my front yard. The dastardly act was one of the most popular of the autumn pranks and something I guess has gone on for years, maybe since there has been toilet paper.

    During the night, while I slumbered away, minor-league terrorists armed with rolls of generic roles of tissue had draped my maple trees in white streamers that hung damp and limp by the next morning.