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Today's Opinions

  • Cowbells and William Tell

    I arrived in Tell City's sister city with bells on. Actually the cows were wearing the bells. I was carrying a camera and ambitions of tracking down William Tell in this town in central Switzerland surrounded by mountains.

    Altdorf, which is German for "old village" is about Tell City's size, with a population in 2002 of 8,700. It's the capital of the Swiss canton of Uri. Switzerland is made up of 26 cantons or states making its official name Confoederatio Helvetica make sense. Swiss money and license plates carry the name or the abbreviation CH.

  • No rational reason for supporting capital punishment

    We editorialized against the death penalty 11 years ago, citing as one of our reasons the fact that innocent people are sometimes wrongly convicted. If they have been executed, there is no way to correct the mistake if they are later proved innocent.

    A news story last week from Melbourne, Australia, emphasized that point again.

  • Cannelton hasn't stood still

    To the citizens and taxpayers of the city of Cannelton: Since a reference has been made from the current mayor that the City of Cannelton has not progressed in the past 12 years, I find it now necessary to present facts as to the increased assets that have been added to the city from 1995 to the end of 2007.

    1. Community center, land and equipment, $1,254,680

    2. Fire station, trucks and equipment, $719,554.56

    3. Police equipment and cars, $93,096.90

    4. Library building and accessories, $600,013.06

  • Traveling fast, eating on the go

    Salami in Stuttgart, pork cutlets in Pforzheim and cucumbers and fish in Freiburg. Another German town, another fast meal. It's my travel-food tradition and last week was no different as I touched down in Munich and spent my first hard-saved euro on a meaty sandwich of lettuce, tomatoes and bacon.

    Just about every German train station has at least one sandwich kiosk - most have several - and I've been hooked on them for years. Traveling alone, I seldom sit down for lunch or supper and since I want to do and see as much as possible, I almost always eat on the go.

  • Remember veterans this Memorial Day, every day

    Today is Memorial Day, a day set aside since 1868 to honor and remember our nation's veterans.

    Then it was called Decoration Day and was established by an organization of Union veterans called the Grand Army of the Republic.

    The first observance was held at Arlington National Cemetery, where officials including Gen. Ulysses S. Grant presided over ceremonies. Children from the Soldiers' and Sailors' Orphan Home and members of GAR made their way through the cemetery reciting prayers and singing hymns while putting flowers on Union and Confederate graves.

  • Foreclosure pain hits home

    My colleagues in Congress and I spent a majority of last week working on, debating and passing bills focused on stabilizing the housing market and strengthening our economy. The faltering housing market has affected all aspects of our economic state. Folks only need to drive around their neighborhoods or down the street to see its devastating effects. Odds are that one in 13 families is currently behind on their mortgage payments.

  • Graduation brings changes for seniors

    As each Perry County senior receives their diploma this week and next, changes are going to happen. No longer are you high-school students confined to an 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. schedule, a structured life of clubs, sports, school work and other obligations tied to school.

    Now is the time to really use what you've learned in those walls to make your decisions count even more than what they have. Experience new things. Go out, do things you never would have thought about doing.

  • Looking back and learning

    Perry County's fourth-graders received quite an education Wednesday while taking part in the annual Old-Fashioned Day at the county fairgrounds.

    Several groups, including Purdue University's extension services in the county and Lincoln Hills Resource Conservation and Development Area help organize volunteers for a day of hands-on learning on what life in the past was like.