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Today's Opinions

  • The roots of our Thanksgiving

    Editor’s Note: This text of President George Washington’s Oct. 3, 1789, national Thanksgiving proclamation was printed in The Providence Gazette and Country Journal and is printed with original spellings, capitalization and punctuation.

    It was submitted by Freewill Baptist Church in Cannelton to commemorate Thursday’s observance of the holiday.

  • Literacy fund honors local teacher's love of books

    When the Donna Fenn Literacy Fund was founded in 2005, her husband and family wanted to establish a way to honor her commitment to early childhood literacy.

    An endowment was created for the benefit of the school where she taught, William Tell Elementary, with a mission to promote literacy-skills development.

  • Other life issues are equally important to abortion issue

    The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ 2007 “Faithful Citizenship” guidelines took a strong stand against abortion, euthanasia, the death penalty and embryonic-stem-cell research and also brought up other issues for voters to consider, such as social justice, the economy and opposition to unjust wars.

    But last week several bishops said abortion should be the main issue Catholic voters should look at when deciding which candidates to back.

  • County well-positioned for growth

    During the past several months, our conversations have been laced with new terms such as housing bubbles, gas prices, market swings, Wall Street meltdown, recession and others that do not bode well for our national economy.

    Our government leadership has taken unprecedented steps to instill confidence in our financial markets and has provided equity to be injected into the most troubled areas.

  • Help others enjoy the holidays

    The upcoming holidays are a time when most of us go out of our way to give to others, whether it’s to children, parents, nieces and nephews or close friends.

    A lot of us mark Christmas by giving to those who are less fortunate, especially children.

    Thanksgiving and Christmas have long been times when we’ve reached out to others. I’m sure that will never change, no matter how commercialized the holidays become, but generosity will be  more of a challenge this year because of the ongoing economic crisis.

  • Remembering the dead

    I head an interesting story recently about how one local church pastor, on the occasion of All Souls Day Nov. 2, invited parishioners to gather in the church cemetery for a blessing of graves.

    Each person was asked to stand by a grave and a few minutes later, with people standing by the graves of relatives, friends and perhaps complete strangers, parishioners remembered the dead.

  • Democracy works!

    Election Day 2008 is, at last, history - but what history was made Tuesday! In the surest sign our nation remains true to its democratic ideals, Americans turned out in record numbers to choose their 44th president.

    Local supporters of Barack Obama and John McCain have every reason to be proud of their candidates and the national dialogue they led on the crucial issues we face: wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, threats to our national security, a struggling economy, health care and even race.

  • A look at the science of aging

    We recognize that human beings do not age at the same rate. Why is this happening? Aging may be described in three different ways, by chronological age, biological age and psychological age.

    It is too late to do anything about your genetic inheritance and your chronological age.

    Biological age is a measurement of how well your physiological systems are functioning. It is the most important component of the aging process.