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Today's Opinions

  • State: Don't recommend obvious, unfeasible actions

    We're not sure how much it amounted to, in terms of the salaries involved, paper and ink expended and so on, but if Indiana school systems are to absorb $297 million in funding cuts, a refund of the costs for developing the "Citizens Checklist" would be a good start.

  • No more icy adventures, please

    I pounded out this column on Friday as the area was preparing for another round of snow. I won't mind the few inches that were forecast as long as it doesn't turn to ice like it did last Tuesday and moves us one step closer to spring.

  • 75 years of forest stewardship

    Editor's Note: The Hoosier National Forest will celebrate its 75th anniversary Feb. 6. Over the next year, Teena Ligman, a public-affairs specialist for the forest, will share aspects of the history of the forest and land-restoration efforts in southern Indiana.

    Congress gave the president authority in 1891 to create forest reserves out of the public domain. Since public-domain lands existed almost entirely in the West, most of the early forest reserves were in the West.

  • Newsprint tax a misguided attempt at reducing waste

    Indiana Rep. David Wolkins made a strange suggestion recently.

    A friend of Wolkins who works in a landfill reportedly told the representative that the majority of waste that he sees in his line of work is tossed-out newspapers. Deciding that this was a problem that he could propose a fix to, Wolkins introduced legislation in House Bill 1355 that would tax newspapers for the newsprint they use.

    By doing this, he believes newspapers will use a greater amount of recycled content, which would reduce the number of old papers lying around in landfills.

  • Don't become a victim of stalking

    January is National Stalking Awareness Month, a time to focus on a crime that affects 3.4 million victims a year. This year's theme is "Stalking: Know It. Name It. Stop It." The designation challenges the nation to fight this dangerous crime by learning more about it.

  • We should ask ourselves hard questions

    Do the collection of communities that make up Perry County have the government and school systems they want and need?

    Many residents would say "yes, we're happy with the way things are."

    That's a perfectly legitimate response. If it's the way the majority of residents feel, perhaps things should remain as they are.

    We have reason to believe, however, some people feel they aren't treated as well as others are, even though they make the same contributions through property and sales taxes.

  • Teach kids about finances

    It was a week or so before Christmas, while following a police officer buying clothes and toys for a young girl, that I passed a boy in the electronics section of Wal-Mart. The pre-teen, maybe 11 or 12 years old, wanted to buy a video game console of some type.

    I overhead his mom asking how he was going to pay for the purchase. The boy pulled out a small wad of bills and said he had saved his money.  

  • A woman worthy of Nobel prize

    Poland was conquered by the Nazi juggernaut early in the second World War. After only five weeks of fierce fighting, the country capitulated.

    The German conquerors herded 450,000 Jewish inhabitants of Warsaw into a 16-block ghetto section of town where they were, in effect, imprisoned, unable to leave.