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Today's Opinions

  • LETTER: Will Right to Work benefit District 74?

    One of my interim study committee assignments is serving on the Committee on Employment Issues. This group is studying two key issues: Right to Work and Project Labor Agreements. We have conducted three full days of hearing from all perspectives: union leaders and members, business leaders, economic developers and site selectors.

    Right-to-work legislation means that an employee cannot be required to join a union or to pay union dues in order to hold a job. It does not decertify nor has it been found to cause decertification of unions.

  • COLUMN: Hunting is not the issue

    By GLENN MARKIEWICZ, Guest Columnist

    I’m writing this because of the article that Mr. Robinson wrote in a national magazine, the American Cooner. I would like to first say I never met this man in my life, so how can he say such outlandish things like I’m against hunting?

    I am not against hunting. I know many people who hunt and I have family members who hunt. I know hunting is a natural order in life and if we didn’t hunt, this world would be overpopulated with animals we would not know what to do with.

  • COLUMN: Why I am back in Perry County

    By PHIL WITTMER, Guest Columnist

    After leaving Tell City and Perry County for the most part in 1963, and moving 300 miles away in 1966, people often ask me why I returned.

    As a matter of fact, I actually ask myself that question occasionally. So, you may ask: “why not Florida, or the Carolinas or south Texas?”  Looking back, like many folks, my wife, Jeanne, and I did have several Southern tier states picked out for possible candidates when we decided to hang up our shingles.

  • EDITORIAL: We’re proud to have ACLU representative in Perry County

    We are pleased by the news that one of Perry County’s own has been appointed to the board of directors for the ACLU of Indiana.

    As the News reported Thursday, Chris Coyle, a graduate of Tell City High School and former Perry County paramedic, considers his appointment an honor. We understand him feeling that way, and believe the honor is not his alone. It’s a “local man does good (for a whole lot of other people)” kind of story that seems to say something good about our community.

  • COLUMN: All pets deserve loving homes

    By KATHY KLEEMAN, Guest Columnist

    This is in response to Rex Robinson’s recent letter. Perry County does need an animal-control officer. We had a very good one in Rhea Gehlhausen. I can tell you from the experience of working with her, that the last thing she wanted was to have to issue a fine or take anyone’s animals. She tried every other option available to her to assist, not punish owners.

  • COLUMN: Admitting our faults

    By VINCE LUECKE, Editor

    The monks of Saint Meinrad Archabbey have a custom of gathering together once or twice a year to share their own faults. I’ve never witnessed one of the “chapter of faults,” but the admission of minor personal flaws was something of a tradition at the Jesuit community in Detroit where I lived for a year in the 1990s.

  • EDITORIAL: Occupy Wall Street reflects Main Street concerns

    Occupy Wall Street demonstrations have taken the nation by storm and while Perry County may seem far removed from the towering facades of Wall Street, many here share the same concerns as those staking out lower Manhattan. We join in their anger over the unfairness of the big-bank bailouts, the excessive role of business and its money in government and a growing economic inequality.  

    Amid these many problems, we hope the grassroots movement doesn’t overlook what’s right with our American economy.

    First, the problems.

  • LETTER: Volunteers needed for local Junior Achievement programs in schools

    If you have been thinking about volunteering for Junior Achievement, now’s your chance.

    Each year, Junior Achievement recruits business professionals, parents, retirees and college students to serve as volunteers to go into schools and teach JA programs.

    These volunteers use their personal experiences and JA’s curricula to teach students different aspects of economics, including how a community works, how to manage personal finances or even how to run a business.