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Today's Opinions

  • Ticks survive subzero temps

    Phil Junker
    Outdoor Tales

    Winter was tough. It had a negative impact on many things, including some plants and animals. But it apparently didn’t hurt the tick population.

    People often think the number of ticks expands during a mild winter and their numbers are reduced by really cold weather. And this past winter, there was plenty of really cold weather.

    However, research reveals it is almost impossible to freeze out the tiny pests.

  • Get ready for more of the same

    Lee Hamilton
    Center on Congress

    I  felt a brief surge of hope about Congress a few weeks ago. I was returning from Easter recess and Capitol Hill was filled with talk about immigration reform, a minimum-wage bill, a spending bill to keep the government operating and maybe even funding for transportation infrastructure. But, as I said, it was brief.

    That’s because the talk turned out to be just that. Immigration reform appears to be headed nowhere, as do tax reform and budgetary discipline. The minimum-wage increase died in the Senate.

  • LETTER: River Sweep 2014 needs your help June 21

    Mark your calendars and make plans to join other volunteers for the 2014 Ohio River Sweep. This event will be held Saturday, June 21, from 9 a.m. until noon at Sunset park in Tell City and Hafele Park in Cannelton.

    The Ohio River Sweep is a riverbank cleanup that extends the entire length of the Ohio River and beyond. More than 3,000 miles of shoreline will be combed for trash and debris.

    This is the largest environmental event of its kind and encompasses six states.

    If you are unable to join us picking up trash, you can help in other ways.

  • LETTER: Heroes show us why voting is so important

    On Tuesday morning, I finished another 14-hour shift about 5 a.m. I thought I’d stop and vote on the way home. I got to Eagle’s Bluff about 20 minutes before the polls opened. I sat in my ol’ truck about to doze off and thought maybe I’d just go home. Why bother?

    Then three good reasons to bother occurred to me. They were Buddy Gude, Mark Miller and Barry Jarvis. Buddy is my wife’s uncle, whom she never met because he is missing in action in Korea. When Mark was young, his family lived across the road from me at Millstone.

  • LETTER: Tootsie Roll drive raises nearly $4,000

    Tell City Knights of Columbus, Council 1172, would like to thank the entire community for the support of our annual Tootsie Roll drive.

    The many volunteers from Council 1172 enjoyed seeing all who were out and about at our many locations and are proud to announce we were successful in achieving donations of approximately $4,000.

    These donations will be contributed equally to the programs for the mentally challenged citizens of Perry County.

  • COLUMN: Editorial failed to present all the facts

    By MENDY LASSALINE
    Perry County Assessor

    This is in response to the May 5 Perry County News editorial titled “Assessor: Do what’s right for community.”

    I feel that a response is warranted and I will address some facts that were left out of the editorial. Since I was not contacted before this was printed, it is my duty to inform the community of what they were denied knowing.

  • COLUMN: Proud to call Tell City and Perry County our new home

    By ZACHARY and LAURA SCHILLING
    Guest Columnists

    Editor’s Note: This is one of an occasional series of guest columns by people who have chosen to move to Perry County or who have chosen to remain here. Columns are provided by the Perry County Quality of Life Committee, a subgroup of the Perry County Development Corp.

  • COLUMN: Generation Gap: Darla Jordan

    By BREANNA SWANEY
    Guest Columnist

    Editor’s Note: The Perry County News is publishing a series of interviews conducted by eighth-graders in Joyce Stath’s English class at Tell City Junior-Senior High School. The interviews are of people one or two generations older than students. Today’s column is by Breanna Swaney, who profiles her grandmother, Darla Jordan.