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Today's Opinions

  • Proposed federal law provides hope for some terminally ill

    This guest editorial first appeared in the (Bedford) Times-Mail.

     

    Don’t give up. Don’t ever give up.” — Jim Valvano

     

    Imagine your child has been diagnosed with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a disease with no discernible cure.

    You have explored and exhausted every conceivable option.

    Though an experimental, potentially life-saving drug has shown promise, the Federal Drug Administration has yet to approve the drug, rendering it unavailable to your child.

  • Transportation change requests at William Tell Elementary

    Due to an excessive number of transportation change requests and to ensure the safety of all elementary students, we will no longer be accepting transportation changes via phone at William Tell Elementary.

    We have always encouraged parents to choose one destination for their students. This destination should be where the student most frequently travels after school.

    We do understand that occasionally situations arise that require parents to alter that destination, and we do plan to allow for that.

  • Indiana education at new heights

    State Rep. Lloyd Arnold

     

    A strong education provides students with the tools they need to become college and career-ready. Providing Hoosier students with opportunities to excel can lead to a robust workforce who is prepared to take Indiana to the next level.

    It is encouraging to see Indiana education making headlines for a number of positive reasons this summer, including more young Hoosiers taking challenging courses in high school and completing college.

  • Too soon to head back to school?

    State Rep. Ron Bacon

    District 75

     

    The new school year is upon us, although it seems like yesterday that my grandkids were just getting off of the bus for summer break. While some may feel ready to get their kids back to school, others may think the break was a bit short. The topic of school start dates is one that has and continues to be discussed by policymakers.

  • Bagworms on the move

    Jeneen Wiche

    Weekend Gardener

     

    Who among us is guilty of not noticing something until it’s too late? Yes, all of a sudden there is nothing left of your blue spruce or arborvitae. Bagworms have been munching on the needles for weeks and we wonder how it all happened.  Well, they are at work right now so go outside and take inventory of your evergreens because that’s what the bagworm likes the most. Now is the time they do their damage unless we put a stop to it.

  • There is crying in baseball ... and spit-up too

    Eric Harris

    Guest Columnist

     

    Before my daughter was born, whenever I saw people with a baby in a non-baby setting like a movie theater (I’ve been at an R-rated movie and heard a baby crying, which is insane) or a professional baseball game, I would think, “Why would you do that? Find a sitter!”

    Now that I’m a parent, I understand why I saw babies at events like that: you cannot allow a baby to make you a shut-in, and you can’t pass your baby off to someone else every time you want to do something fun.

  • We shouldn’t condone animal cruelty

    Regarding the photo in a recent edition of the Perry County News showcasing the pig chasing/wrestling “contest” at the 4-H fair:  please allow a brief protestation.

  • City needs to end annexation efforts

    It is irresponsible for Tell City to continue the annexation fight. It will take over 150 years for them to recoup $10,010,550 at 1-percent interest. That’s providing water, sewer, fire hydrants, and electric for 157 houses, while losing $120,000 the first three years. That’s if they get bond money.

    Is this is about the new totally electric hospital being in the city limits? Well that idea is a wash. They are laying people off.

    If this is about population growth, Tell City is losing people.