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Today's Opinions

  • LETTER: Religions should not impose will on others

    I’m writing a letter in response to seeing a young restaurant worker being taken to task for having a tattoo by some people who evidently had just been to church, at least they said they had.

    In all seriousness they said her body was God’s temple and she was committing a sin by having a tattoo, even though no one in their right mind would find this tattoo offensive.

  • COLUMN: Where is the pastor’s voice?

    By TIM SCHNEIDER
    Guest Columnist

    I’m writing in response to a letter published in the Aug. 5 issue titled “Vigilance will keep religion out of politics” and written by Elijah Bryant.

    First of all, there is no way to keep religion out of politics, work, school or homes. The only question is what religion will be taught in these places. The religion we choose will determine what is morally acceptable in our society.

    • Muslims accept honor killings as moral.

  • COLUMN: Fishin’ with catalpa worms

    By TOM TURPIN
    Guest Columnist

    Years ago when I was growing up on a farm in Kansas, my old neighbor had what he lovingly called his fishin’ worm tree.

    Back in those days, I didn’t know much about trees, other than some were good for climbing. But I did know the worms I used for fishing were found in the soil. So my neighbor’s name for the tree was a bit confusing.

  • EDITORIAL: Utah football coach right in punishment of team

    In this age of social media and Internet technology, it shouldn’t be any surprise that bullying has become easier for kids, especially in the form of cyber bullying. Schools across the country have done their part to put a stop to bullying of all types, including all three schools in Perry County.

    We commend and fully support these efforts. And that’s why we think one high-school football coach in Utah deserves the same praise for his recent punishment of his entire team.

  • COLUMN: Criminal-reform proposal includes good, bad changes

    S. ROD ACCHIARDO
    County Prosecutor

    During the 2013 legislative session, the General Assembly took positive steps in enacting the first comprehensive criminal code reform since 1977 in House Enrolled Act 1006. That means there had not been any significant change to the criminal code in more than 36 years. An overhaul has long been overdue. This was a significant step toward a better criminal-justice system in Indiana, with protection of the public tempered by the fair treatment of those accused of committing crimes.

  • LETTER: Your support of United Way helps Crisis Connection serve vicitims of domestic violence

    Crisis Connection Inc., would like to thank the United Way of Perry County for its financial support of our organization. We would also like to thank everyone who contributed to the United Way of Perry County as you helped make this allocation to us possible.

    Crisis Connection is a local agency that offers a variety of services to families affected by domestic or sexual violence. We serve Perry, Spencer, Dubois, Orange, Crawford, Martin, Daviess, and Pike counties.

  • LETTER: Council on Aging counts on United Way

    The Perry County Council on Aging would like to thank the United Way for their contribution to their senior center, the Older Americans Korner for Service. The funding the United Ways gives to us goes toward so many valuable and worthwhile activities and projects for our seniors in Perry County and without the funding from the United Way, we would not be able to provide the transportation service that helps and serves so many seniors.

    I have tried to summarize just a few of the things we do at the center and where our United Way funding is used.

  • LETTER: Policy threatens financial security of retirees

    A flawed policy initiative called the chained CPI is gaining steam in Washington budget talks that would short-change Hoosiers who receive federal benefits such as Social Security and federal annuities by lowballing their annual cost-of-living adjustments.

    Chained CPI supporters have tried to minimize the consequences it will have on seniors, retired federal employees and veterans by calling it a “technical adjustment” or “better measure of inflation.”