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Today's Opinions

  • Memories of simpler times

    Come with me now, back in time, back before the Internet. I'm talking about way back, back before Nintendo or Sega, herpes or AIDS, school shootings or political correctness.

    When you could buy stuff from the store without safety caps and hermetic seals, because no one had to worry about being poisoned by a perfect stranger.

    I'm talking about back to homemade ice cream on a Sunday afternoon, hide-and-seek, Simon says, red-light-green-light, climbing trees and making forts.

  • Tell City's festival stage is set

    Tell City's sesquicentennial is nearly upon us and the eight-day celebration of the city's founding, I'm sure, will be a grand success.

    As I pen this Friday morning, signs with historical photos of city landmarks are being placed across the downtown in preparation for historical society walking tours, grass along Main Street sidewalks is being mowed and the new banners of William Tell are glistening wet after a brief shower. Things are truly taking shape.

    If you haven't finalized your sesquicentennial plans, here are a few suggestions.

  • Federal shield law will protect public's right to know

    Hoosier citizens should be proud that three of our own congressmen are sponsors of a bill that would preserve the right to learn about malfeasance in government and elsewhere.

    The Free Flow of Information Act, a federal shield law for reporters, was written by Rep. Mike Pence, R-Ind. Sen. Richard Lugar, R-Ind., authored a companion bill in the senate and Sen. Evan Bayh, D-Ind., joined as a co-sponsor.

  • Time-capsule items needed

    Fireworks over the Ohio River the night of Saturday, Aug. 9, will formally close Tell City's sesquicentennial celebration, but another event a week or two later might be billed not only as the final event of the 2008 celebration, but also the opening event of the community's 2058 bicentennial.

    That event, likely to take place in City Hall Park, is the sealing of a sesquicentennial time capsule packed with items from Tell City in 2008. It will be opened in 2058, the 200th anniversary of the city's founding.

  • We can all be partners in pride

    Small signs placed in the yards of a handful of Tell City homes, and accompanying photos in The News, won't make all the eyesores in Tell City go away. But recognizing everyday efforts at keeping the city beautiful remind us that we can all lend a hand in helping our communities look their best.

  • We need new, not old, energy ideas

    Our nation has entered a new phase in its history: the beginning of the end of cheap, abundant energy. Southern Indiana Power director Mike Hammack's column (June 30 issue of The News) rightfully points to this profound problem we are facing, an energy crisis.

    In consideration of where we go from here, we must be willing to take a more honest look and ask deeper questions than either Hammack or his Web site recommend.

  • Don't forget the turn signal

    Had the young-lady driver been able to decipher the words coming from my lips, she might have rammed her blue Buick into my front bumper.

    The woman's sin didn't justify the bad words or the fist-pounding I gave my steering wheel. But I was still peeved and wondered why the driver - and a growing number of others like her - don't use their vehicles' turn signals.

    The lady driving the Buick was coming down the hill in Troy, leading a parade of cars and trucks through the hillside construction zone between Troy and Tell City.

  • Hard work, time promise to make 50th Schweizer Fest, sesquicentennial memorable

    This year has flown by and it's only a short three weeks until Tell City kicks off its 50th annual Schweizer Fest and sesquicentennial celebration.

    Here at The News, we've been working on a variety of activities to get ourselves ready for the event. We're all working on special publications and stories for the celebration as well as making and assembling items for our window display and a float for the Aug. 2 parade.