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Today's Opinions

  • Beams of hope appear in warrantless-wiretapping case

    Like a beam of sunlight breaking through dark storm clouds, a glimmer of hope appeared Thursday in a National Public Radio report.

    NPR's Martin Kaste said the state-secrets tactic has failed to stop a lawsuit contending the U.S. government violated the privacy rights of an Islamic charity when it monitored the group's telephone conversations without obtaining a warrant first.

  • Don't let summer slip away

    A long time ago, when summers came without a job, mortgage or other real-world responsibilities, the months of June and July seemed to be heaven-sent. There were, admittedly, farm chores to shoulder, hay to haul and a lawn to mow, but those were trifling interruptions in what seemed to be an endless string of carefree days.

    It's been during weeks like these that I miss those summers and long to roll back the years.

  • Improving mpg good idea but going electric would be better

    President Barack Obama's recently announced plan to require automobiles to average 35.5 miles per gallon of gasoline by 2016 has evoked criticism from a variety of sources.

    We agree that the plan is not perfect, but we think much of the criticism is misguided.

    Obama's proposal would require cars to average 39 mpg and light trucks to average 30 mpg under a system that develops standards for each vehicle class. It would also require automobiles to reduce carbon-dioxide emissions by about one-third.

  • A few notes from the newsroom

    Today's column is a potluck of sorts, bits of news and small items sent to me by readers over the past week that I've been moving from one stack of papers on my desk to the other.

    Mars Disappointments

    I received an e-mail Wednesday from Pam Hilgenhold, mother of Perry Central student Levi Hilgenhold. I wrote a story in March about Levi's selection by NASA as one of nine finalists to name a new Mars rover.

  • Providing help to Dean

    Editor's Note: Logan Harding took first-place honors with this essay, submitted in the annual Friends of Southern Hills Writing Contest. Students were asked to place themselves in the role of an elected official and to respond to a constituent who needed their help with a personal or family problem.

    The Humvee cruised through the small town on the Iraq border. As the 142nd Airbome Division drove through the town, a man ran out in the road in front of them.

  • What will you risk for freedom's sake?

    The release of a damning report detailing decades of abuse of young people in Ireland's church-operated reform schools didn't make the headlines it should have last week, at least not in the United States.

    Call it old news.

  • Students value newspapers

    All newspapers worry about hanging on to their readers. Publishers, editors and circulation managers fret about studies that show today's young readers don't take as much interest in newspapers as their parents and grandparents.

    That's not good news and may be a result of increased competition from online news as well as newspapers not providing content geared to young readers. What it means is that newspapers need to do more to get young people connected with their hometown newspapers.

  • Liberal policies sunk housing

    The economic travails that we are experiencing began with the collapse of the housing market. Sub-prime, low-interest loans to people who lacked sufficient income to make their monthly payments began this tumble into oblivion.

    Follow along. The origin of the sub-prime market collapse goes back to 1977, when Carter signed into law the Community Reinvestment Act. It was passed by a Congress even more profoundly liberal than today's.