Today's Opinions

  • PTO grateful for fall festival’s success

    On Oct. 24, our 68th annual Fall Festival enjoyed a tremendous turnout from students, staff and community supporters. Cannelton Elementary’s Parent-Teacher Organization would like to thank the following individuals and businesses for helping make this year’s festival a huge success.

  • Taste of the Holiday had many helpers

    Thank you to everyone who attended the Perry County Chamber of Commerce 2013 “Taste of the Holidays” event.  You helped make this a great event by getting a taste of local food, wine and shopping.

    Thank you to the entrepreneurs and businesses that donated to the silent auction and to those that participated in the booth sales opportunity the event provided. You were a huge part of the event and we thank you for participating.

  • Former educator thankful for trips to county

    Again, I had the pleasure of attending the St. Isidore shooting match this year. Thanks again to Terry Kempf, who provided my transportation.

    I enjoyed conversations with several fine folks of Perry County, one person being recently retired Gordon Taylor, a fine gentleman from the Perry Central Community School Corp.

    I have enjoyed my visits to the Tell City nursing centers, where I have given concerts at happy hour time.

    Some of my former Perry Central students’ parents and grandparents may be residing there.

  • Legislators organize for session

    Richard Young
    District 47
    State Senator

    Before 1970, our state constitution required that a newly-elected General Assembly meet only once every two years. However, in 1970, Hoosier voters approved a constitutional amendment to allow state legislators to determine the length and frequency of sessions, thus allowing the General Assembly to meet annually.

    This achievement provides more time to thoroughly address the many complex issues facing our state, including matters that develop between sessions.

  • EDITORIAL: Wanted: Politicians with backbones

    Once Congress was populated with statesmen who debated the issues and voted on bills based on their merits, not based on the latest polls.

    Their decisions were also made on what was in a bill, not on who proposed it, as members of Congress often reached across the aisle to find bipartisan support on issues. And if members had objections to a bill, they proposed a viable alternative instead of just saying no and hoping the issue would disappear.

    Sadly, those days appear to be gone.

  • Dogged journalism is democracy’s blessing, not curse

    Lee Hamilton
    Center on Congress

    Let’s start with the obvious: A democracy needs intelligence agencies. It needs to know what’s happening in the world – and understand the plans of allies and enemies – to keep the nation prepared and secure.

    If intelligence work is going to be effective, much of it has to be done in secret.

  • COLUMN: Do I have a responsibility to protect our readers?

    Managing Editor

    I’d like to address a complaint I hear about my writing from time to time.

    The latest discontent came in reaction to a story I wrote about the Cannelton Common Council discussing the fact that some people were simulating sexual activity in the city’s Gazebo Park.

  • Indiana’s governor offers vision for public education

    Mike Pence
    Indiana Governor

    Indiana’s students and schools have made great progress in recent years. According to the latest scores from the National Assessment of Educational Progress, Indiana is improving at the second fastest rate of any state in the country. We owe this progress to the hard work of our students, teachers and the parents and school reformers everywhere who have insisted that we hold our-selves to high standards.