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Today's Opinions

  • Cicadas … music to your ears

    Jeneen Wiche

    Weekend Gardener

     

    One of my favorite things about summer is my front row seat at the orchestra. The orchestra of insects, that is. Late summer, when temperatures cool down enough to turn the air conditioner off and open the windows, we fall asleep to the sounds of katydids, crickets and cicadas. I sometimes cheat in the heat of the summer and crack the window in my office so I can hear the insects and the birds as I work at the computer or in the kitchen.

  • Uneven corn due to poor pollination

    Jeneen Wiche

    Weekend Gardener

     

    Corn has been a staple food for centuries. It was first cultivated by Indian peoples in Central America; in fact, the adoption of agriculture and the art of cultivating gave way to the grand cities of the Aztec and Mayans. What would the world be without corn and potatoes, both of which were first cultivated in Central America?

  • An eyesore unworthy of Tell City’s Swiss spirit

    It was a showdown of sorts on Seventh Street a few weeks ago. Carolyn Barr stood in the front yard of the dilapidated Obrecht House, barring city officials from looking inside.

    Her attorney had already said the News couldn’t go inside. Though disappointed, we acknowledged the house is private property. City employees, among them the police chief, had no warrant so they milled around a little and went back to City Hall for their meeting on what to do with Barr and her home.

  • A clean city and a clean conscience

    A dollar is a dollar and most of us avoid wasting even one. But shame on those who swindle the city out of a trash tag just to save a buck.

    As we’ve reported several times over the past year or two, the city faces a growing problem of people who either refuse to tag their trash bags or who cut tags in half, then try to finagle the tags so it appears there is a full tag on the bag.

    The city catches violators and charges them the full buck. We’d suggest a fine.

  • Schweizer Fest traditions

    Vince Luecke

    Editor

    editor@perry countynews.com

     

    For me, this week’s Schweizer Fest is a lot like some holidays. There is plenty of extra work, so much in fact that finding time to enjoy the actual festivities can be a challenge. 

    The weeks before Schweizer Fest have our staff working on the combined program guide and Zeitung.  It was included in the paper a couple of weeks ago. We also publish a pre-Schweizer Fest sample edition. That’s the issue you’re holding now.

  • Historical society awarded grant

    The Tell City Historical Society was among the first Heritage Support Grant award winners made available through the Indiana Historical Society.  The Tell City Historical Society will be making repairs to the exterior and roof of the current Carnegie Library building. 

    The society was awarded $19,115.

    The Tell City Historical Society is also fundraising for a required local match and interior water damage repairs and to continue the energy efficiency updates to the original part of the building.

  • I am confident that by working together, we can continue to make great strides to confront this public health crisis.

    Jeff Thomas, in “The Blind Leading the Clueless,” thoughtfully assessed the dilemma the American people face. I highly recommend patriots read and digest his article’s perspective which can be found at www.internationalman.com/articles/the-blind-leading-the-clueles.

    “They [our leaders] don’t want war, but are invading more countries than ever before in history. Political hopefuls are vague at best regarding their proposed platforms for action, yet they attack each other as though they’re reporters for the tabloids.

  • 17 days of Hoosier food and fun at the state fair

    State Rep. Lloyd Arnold

    District 74

     

    It’s that time of year again here in Indiana. Fried foods, 4-H shows, concerts and so much more come together for the Indiana State Fair, which runs Aug. 5-21.

    Visitors will have the opportunity to experience one of the best state fairs yet, as Indiana celebrates its 200th birthday. Our state’s history, art, folklore and traditions will be highlighted through new exhibits that display what it means to be a Hoosier, both past and present.