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Letters

  • Thanks for making Boy Scouts’ fish fry a success

    The St. Paul Boy Scouts Troop 192 would like to gratefully thank all those who supported their recent fish  fry  at the parish hall. The attendance was overwhelming. And thanks, too, to those who bought a ticket but were unable to come.

    This event could not have gone off as well as it did without the adult volunteers who gave their time in preparation, brought in desserts and in serving the food.

    The proceeds will help a lot with expenses for this summer’s camp. Thanks again.

     

  • Other city 4-way stops need attention

    I just read the article in the Feb. 23 issue of the News concerning traffic at Humboldt and Main streets. I understand the mayor’s dilemma. I live in the 200 block of 14th Street near the intersection of 14th and Washington streets. This intersection is a school bus stop and also one block away from a busy city park.

    We receive a lot of traffic off of Indiana 66 and the area is near Papa John’s and Long John Silvers. It is also an area high in traffic accidents.

  • City council and pet discussion

    With all due respect to our esteemed city council, the council is barking up the wrong tree.  The problem with pet ownership is not numbers, but quality of care and supervision. 

    Yes, the homeowner who has 45 cats/dogs is clearly wrong, but it is just as clear, this is a rare situation. The main problem the county/city faces is that of dogs running loose, unsupervised and harassing people, as well as being in danger of being hit by a car.

  • Wanted: Legislative action on townships

    A recent story about charges being filed against a township trustee in Henry County for stealing taxpayer funds between 2013 and 2015 is unfortunately not surprising. It is yet another arrest in a long series of criminal incidents involving township employees that have occurred around the state.

    The Indiana Chamber first communicated on the topic of local government reform and ongoing abuses by township officials nearly 20 years ago. The fact that we still must do so today is depressing and unforgivable.

  • Know your humane society

    First of all, we are not the animal shelter, but rather, a totally separate organization which sometimes works with the shelter on projects that have a common purpose. We receive no money from the county, state or any city. We are funded through our membership fees, only $5 per year, special events such as yard sales and through donations from generous individuals like you.

    We do not board animals and do not have animals for adoption. We do maintain a shelter which is used for short term care of animals in emergency situations.

  • Language and democracy in the Trump era

    In a recent column in the News (Jan. 19), Hoosier statesman and former U.S. congressman Lee Hamilton addressed a problem that, while it did not begin with Donald Trump’s election, has certainly become more pronounced in its wake.

  • TCHS Renaissance class says thanks

    Tell City High School’s Renaissance class would like to thank the following individuals and businesses for contributing to our spaghetti dinner and silent auction.

    Without these people, we would have not been able to have the success we did.

    We were able to raise money to help carry out our recognition programs such as our Academic Pep Rally. 

    First, we would like to give a special thanks to Ryan Werner and the Post for catering our event.

  • Why not turn the old hospital into a veterans home?

    We have a vacant building that’s not getting any use. It has been vacant for nearly three years, but it’s still very functional and is a building that could be utilized for homeless veterans.

    Presently, there are no housing facilities in this area specifically for them, and this project could serve veterans all across southwestern Indiana. We need to step up to the plate and  provide housing for veterans who are homeless or who are at risk of  homelessness.

  • Perry County Humane Society’s White Dog Fund will help save animal lives

    At the end of 2016, an incident happened that is to commend to all who became involved in Perry County. A dog was hit by a car that crushed its leg beyond repair.

    Fortunately a teenager happened by and found the dog on the side of the road and got the dog to one of our local vets just in time to save its life. The dogs temp, had fallen to around 80 degrees and it was administered fluids.

  • Foundation’s trivia night a big hit

    On behalf of the Perry County Community Foundation Advisory Board, I want to say thank you to all the participants and businesses who made the 2017 Trivia Night a success. Proceeds from the night assist the foundation in its mission to help donors give back to our community in a way that’s impactful and lasts forever.