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Letters

  • LETTER - Community made TC schools’ career fair a success

    On April 11, Tell City Junior-Senior High School students in grades 7-12 were given the opportunity to participate in a career fair. Students each spent an hour engaging with local business leaders, gaining valuable knowledge on education, training and employment opportunities in various career pathways.

    We would like to express our appreciation to the following businesses for making the career fair a success for our students:

  • LETTER - Perry County habitat for eagles should be protected

    I would just like to submit my findings in regard to the Eagles Bluff article in the Perry County News April 14.

  • LETTER - DAR members appreciate help with dedication event

    On April 5, the Lafayette Spring Chapter of the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution held a dedication ceremony for Pvt. Jacob Kepler, a Revolutionary War veteran buried in Perry County.

    The ceremony took place at the Rome Methodist Church with a reception following at the Old Rome Courthouse.

    There were nine chapters from the Daughters of the American Revolution and the Sons of the American Revolution in attendance. Also helping with the ceremony were members of Harry G. Myers American Legion Post 142.

  • Thank you for donating, USW

    The Perry County Council of Agencies food pantry and clothing bank members would like to thank USW No. 1261 for their recent donation.

    Funds are greatly appreciated as there continues to be a need in this area. We are grateful for all donations.

    GEORGANN GOGEL
    Coordinator

  • Reader appreciated agriculture week section of News

    I must take time out from my busy schedule to compliment you on your fine Perry County News newspaper. I especially enjoy reading about the folks I learned to know during my almost 25 years of teaching in Perry County at Perry Central schools.

  • Annexation conflicts of interest exist

    On the annexation issue, let me get this straight.

    Marlow Smethurst is chairman of the Tell City Annexation Committee and also the superintendent of the Tell City Electric Department.  J.B. Land is chairman of the Electric Utility’s board and chairman of the hospital’s board of trustees.

    Is the tail (electric utility and hospital board) wagging the dog (city management and citizens)?

    Darla Olberding
    Evansville

  • Our emergency responders do a great job

    I am writing this letter because of something that happened earlier this month. There was a terrible accident on my road, just about in front of my house. I did not see the actual moment it happened, but I heard the impact the second it did.

    When we ran to the front porch and saw what had happened, we knew it was a very terrible accident.

    Our thoughts and prayers are with both families. But, this letter is to praise the first responders.

  • Help made Renaissance yard sale a success

    The Tell City High School Renaissance Leadership Class  thanks the public for attending and supporting our annual yard sale, which was held March 15.

    The proceeds go to help fund the Renaissance Leadership Class, which supports academics and community involvement.

    We extend a special thank you to the following businesses and individuals for their support:

  • Drivers ignore law at SR 66 intersection

    I have seen this happen often lately to other people and I have almost been hit there more than once.

    When you are coming out of Wal-Mart and turning right toward Tell City on Indiana 66 on a green light, you have the right-of-way.

    The person who is turning left across the intersection by Subway toward Tell City does not have right-of-way.  

    Since I see this often I went to the Tell City Police Station to find out for sure.  I was met there by a most unfriendly officer who did take the time to tell me that I was right.

  • A critical health-care program in rural America

    Rural hospitals are the front line of care for millions of Americans who can’t travel to big cities for medical treatment. Most are small, less than 25 beds, and many struggle to keep their doors open in the face of rising costs. A little-known prescription drug program called 340B helps these providers stay in business—and extend vital services to needy patients.

    More than 20 years ago, Congress created the 340B drug discount program with bipartisan support to help hospitals serving high numbers of economically vulnerable people.